FFOLD - American Cities Climate Challenge
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Funding Guidance

Federal Funding Opportunities for Local Decarbonization

Navigating federal funding for local climate action and making strategic decisions on how to best pursue opportunities can be overwhelming and challenging. This tool helps local governments prioritize and leverage existing federal funding to advance system-wide energy transition goals—from block grants and technical assistance to competitive grants and loans. Use the filters below to filter available funding sources automatically and focus on the funding sources relevant to your project, goals, and community.

Scope

This tool, Federal Funding Opportunities for Local Decarbonization (FFOLD), focuses on energy sector emissions, including electricity, transportation, buildings, and resilient energy systems. It does not explicitly capture funding for other sustainability solutions. FFOLD focuses on programs for state, local, and tribal entities. Local agencies/authorities generally include cities, counties, towns, public utility providers, transit agencies, airports, ports, and local educational agencies (e.g. school districts).For additional clarifications and definitions, download FFOLD and refer to the Glossary of Terms tab.

Updates

FFOLD will be updated on a quarterly basis until otherwise noted. This version of FFOLD was last updated September 23, 2022.

Equity Considerations

A companion piece to this tool—”Equity Design Considerations for Federal Funding“—lists resources to help FFOLD users and broader audiences pursue equitable climate action, project design, and planning.

Methodology

Funding sources were identified and incorporated into this tool based upon two main factors: 1) applicant eligibility for state, local, and tribal entities; and 2) activity eligibility for decarbonization projects and initiatives that are either explicitly described and/or potentially allowed under the programmatic rules and agency guidance. This tool incorporates research and reviews of agency websites, the Federal Register, Grants.gov, and federal legislation. Contact Matthew Popkin (mpopkin@rmi.org) or Alex Dane (alex.dane@wri.org) with any questions or feedback.

Displaying 21 out of 204 Funding Opportunities
New or Existing Program Name Purpose Agency Sub-Department Eligibility Requirements Matching Funding Available Max Award Expected Allocations Average Award Deadline Decarbonization Considerations Equity Considerations Helpful Tips Other Notes Only for Federal Emergency Declaration? Webpage
Existing - Constant Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities To provide quick, targeted technical assistance to selected communities to contribute environmental and economic sustainability, using a variety of tools that have demonstrated results and widespread application. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Community Revitalization Eligible applicants include local, county, or tribal governments, or nonprofit organizations that have the support of the local government on whose behalf they are applying. N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A November 20, 2020 Consider projects and plans that can achieve decarbonization while improving community resiliency. For example, what kinds of street design can encourage walking instead of driving? How to integrate distributed energy resources (DERs) when revitalizing downtowns and existing neighborhoods? Can these deployments demonstrate the benefits of decarbonization measures and raise community awareness? Applicants need to use data to demonstrate the challenge their community faces and describe how this challenge affects low-income, minority, tribal, and/or other communities facing disproportionate environmental or health risks. The letter of interest should also describe plans for engaging traditionally underrepresented communities to ensure equitable access and meaningful engagement. EPA offers 19 tools through this program. Not every tool is offered in every round. Once EPA has used a tool in several communities, the tool will be refined to create a product that any community can use with limited outside assistance. Local governments are encouraged to navigate emerging challenges with existing tools. Past Recipients and Tools can be found here: https://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/building-blocks-sustainable-communities-past-recipients-and-tools EPA provides direct assistance through a federal contract; therefore, no funds are transferred to the community. The initial application requires a two-page write-up detailing how the assistance will help the community. After that, EPA will request next step memos and notify applicants of the due. Local governments with ideas should submit their letters of interest to seize the opportunities. No https://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/building-blocks-sustainable-communities
Existing - IIJA Increase Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) To invest in and undertake hazard mitigation projects, reducing the risks communities face from disasters and natural hazards. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Local governments/municipalities are eligible to apply as sub-applicants to states. Homeowners, business operators, and non-profit organizations cannot apply directly to FEMA but can be included in a sub-application submitted by an eligible sub-applicant. Note: Applicants must have a FEMA-approved State, Local, or Tribal Hazard Mitigation Plan by the application deadline and at the time of obligation of grant funds. 25% match required, unless applicant is economically disadvantaged rural community $2,300,000,000 TBA 125 $18,400,000 January 27, 2023; state deadlines vary (see "Helpful Tips") BRIC is designed to advance broad, impactful, flexible, and innovative resiliency solutions that enhance the energy system and access to energy during disasters. For FY 2022, the priorities for the program are to incentivize natural hazard risk reduction activities that mitigate risk to public infrastructure and disadvantaged communities; incorporate nature-based solutions including those designed to reduce carbon emissions; enhance climate resilience and adaptation; and increase funding to applicants that facilitate the adoption and enforcement of the latest published editions of building codes. BRIC encourages hazard mitigation projects that meet multiple program priorities. BRIC has a priority focus of benefiting disadvantaged communities, defined as those facing conditions including, but not limited to, low income, high and/or persistent poverty, high unemployment/underemployment, racial and ethnic segregation, high housing cost burdens, distressed neighborhoods, disproportionate impacts from climate change, high energy cost burden and low energy access, jobs lost from the energy transition, and limited access to healthcare. Flexible backup power solutions (i.e. local community resiliency hubs) can be deployed to support remote, marginalized residents with limited access to more centralized facilities. State deadlines will vary for sub-applicants to be considered, typically 1-3 months prior to the FEMA deadline. Contact your State Hazard Mitigation Officer (SHMO) to learn about potential state deadline to plan accordingly: https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/state-contacts In addition to project selections, the BRIC Program offers help to communities in the form non-financial Direct Technical Assistance (DTA). Read more here: https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/building-resilient-infrastructure-communities/direct-technical-assistance For past program details, see here: https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/building-resilient-infrastructure-communities/after-apply/fy-2021-subapplication-status No https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/building-resilient-infrastructure-communities
Existing - Increase Choice Neighborhoods - Implementation Grants To support those communities that have undergone a comprehensive local planning process and are ready to implement their “Transformation Plan” to redevelop the neighborhood. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) Public and Indian Housing The eligible applicant must demonstrate that the proposal targets an eligible housing project and is located in an eligible neighborhood. Eligible applicants include Public Housing Agencies (PHAs), local governments, tribal entities, and nonprofits. 5% match required $150,000,000 $50,000,000 5 $30,000,000 Fall 2022 Consider integrating community solar, building-tied solar and storage for backup power, EV charging infrastructure, nature-based heat island mitigation strategies, and other sustainable solutions that benefit the broader community. For community solutions, align the solutions with the priorities of the community. For housing-specific solutions, consider prioritizing the distributed energy resource solutions that have the largest reduction on occupants' energy burden. Use HUD Mapping tool to determine eligible neighborhoods: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/maps/CN/home.html N/A No https://www.hud.gov/program_offices/public_indian_housing/programs/ph/cn/fy22funding
Existing - Increase Choice Neighborhoods - Planning Grants To support the development of comprehensive neighborhood revitalization plans which focused on directing resources to address three core goals: Housing, People and Neighborhoods. The Transformation Plan will become the guiding document for the revitalization of the public and/or assisted housing units while simultaneously directing the transformation of the surrounding neighborhood and positive outcomes for families. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) Public and Indian Housing The eligible applicant must demonstrate that the proposal targets an eligible housing project and is located in an eligible neighborhood. Eligible applicants include Public Housing Agencies (PHAs), local governments, tribal entities, and nonprofits. 5% match required $10,000,000 $500,000 20 $500,000 July 28, 2022 Consider integrating community solar, resilience hubs, building-tied solar and storage for backup power, EV charging infrastructure, nature-based heat island mitigation strategies, and other sustainable solutions that benefit the broader community. For community solutions, align the solutions with the priorities of the community. For housing-specific solutions, consider prioritizing the distributed energy resource solutions that have the largest reduction on occupants' energy burden. Ensure that your planning grant is optimized by embracing decarbonization and resilience strategies. Effectively implemented planning grants make your community more competitive for the Choice Implementation grants. Use HUD Mapping tool to determine eligible neighborhoods: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/maps/CN/home.html N/A No https://www.hud.gov/program_offices/public_indian_housing/programs/ph/cn/fy22funding
New - IRA Climate Pollution Reduction Grants (Climate Pollution Plans and Implementation Grants) To support a technology-neutral approach to planning and implementation of greenhouse gas pollution reduction strategies. TBA TBA Funding is available for states, territories, DC, tribes, and municipalities to develop and implement greenhouse gas emissions reduction plans. TBA $5,000,000,000 N/A N/A N/A No later than Summer 2023 Consider tangible, community-supported plans and efforts that can substantially reduce emissions, such as public transit system enhancement or extension, or major retrofit and electrification of public schools, and public housing. Consider prioritizing projects that are located in economically and environmentally distressed communities, and maximizing the long-term benefits for residents of the region. Local governments are encouraged to integrate community benefits into project scopes and milestones. Municipal departments/agencies are encouraged to work together to develop comprehensive emission reduction plans. Consider leveraging private investment to expand efforts. $250,000,000 is for planning activities and $4,750,000,000 is for implementation grants. No
Existing - Increase Community Development Block Grants - Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) To help cities, counties, and states recover from Presidentially-declared disasters. The grants focus on low-income areas, subject to availability of supplemental appropriations. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) Community Planning and Development Funds are awarded to state and local governments that become grantees. Those who receive grant money include state agencies, non-profit organizations, economic development agencies, citizens, and businesses. Eligible use of funds can be found here: https://files.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/CDBG-DR-Policy-Guide.pdf Not required Depends on Stafford Act funding Varies by city and state Varies by city and state Varies by city and state As released by Congress enacting the Stafford Act after Federally Declared Disaster. States and local governments have encountered tragic circumstances and the road to recovery is long. Given those circumstances, this adaptive funding resource arrives after the wave of initial FEMA and inter-agency "response" support and provides a longer-term, strategic set of funds for spurring physical investments that prioritize the safety and economic well-being of those most vulnerable in a community. Eligible activities for CDBG-DR can be used for both resilience, recovery and decarbonization of the building, transportation, and power service sectors through infrastructure investments. For example, deploying renewable energy and incorporating energy storage into community facilities and public institutions are suitable measures to maintain reliability. Also, consider establishing local loan loss reserves (possibly in partnership with a local Community Development Financial Institution) to support financing programs for solar energy that are accessible to members of marginalized communities Developing the required Action Plan is a critical step in unlocking CDBG-DR funds for a local government or other qualified recipient (county/state), both procedural and distributional equity emphasis can be and should be employed as stakeholder input is gathered and integrated into the development of the plan and the future use of the CDBG-DR funds within a community. As set forth in HUD guidance, this process encourages local governments and other eligible entities to be proactive and inclusive in implementation. Per HUD's CDBG-DR Guidance, citizen participation is both encouraged and required throughout the CDBG-DR grant process. Each grantee’s Action Plan must include a Citizen Participation Plan which describes how the public will be informed and engaged throughout the grant’s lifecycle. For additional information on planning with equity in mind, check out HUD CDBG-DR's guidance: https://www.hudexchange.info/programs/cdbg-dr/resources/#equity-in-disaster-planning-and-recovery For additional guidance, see HUD's policy guidance and fact sheet for CDBG-DR: https://files.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/CDBG-DR-Policy-Guide.pdf https://files.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/CDBG-DR-Fact-Sheet.pdf To determine eligibility for federal disaster declaration funding, please check FEMA's website at https://www.fema.gov/disasters/disaster-declarations. No https://www.hudexchange.info/programs/cdbg-dr/
Existing - Increase Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) To develop viable urban communities by providing decent housing, a suitable living environment, and expand economic opportunities for low- and moderate-income persons. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) Community Planning and Development CDBG funds may be used for activities that include, but are not limited to: acquisition of real property, relocation and demolition, rehabilitation of residential and non-residential structures, construction of public facilities and improvements, such as water and sewer facilities, streets, neighborhood centers, and the conversion of school buildings for eligible purposes, public services, within certain limits, activities relating to energy conservation and renewable energy resources, provision of assistance to profit-motivated businesses to carry out economic development and job creation/retention activities. Not required FY22 CDBG Formula Grant Allocations by Jurisdiction: https://www.hud.gov/program_offices/comm_planning/budget/fy22 Varies by city and state Allocation by formula Varies by city and state Annual Action Plans are typically due in May for next federal fiscal year CDBG funds remain one of the most versatile and well-known funding streams utilized by state and local governments. The ability to acquire, develop, rehabilitate, relocate real property assets in conjunction with eligibility to use funds for energy and renewable energy creates a vital, recurring and dependable source of public funds for physical assets. Local and state program administrators have significant opportunity to influence and guide funding towards: new construction of public facilities that with net-zero energy performance and resilience systems; development and implementation of energy efficiency programs for municipal buildings and more broadly to commercial and residential sectors; investment in clean energy projects serving municipal operations and essential community services; and workforce development and job training programs surrounding community solar and other renewable energy resources A grantee must develop and follow a detailed plan which provides for, and encourages, citizen participation and which emphasizes participation by persons of low- or moderate-income, particularly residents of predominantly low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, slum or blighted areas, and areas in which the grantee proposes to use CDBG funds. Each activity must meet one of the following national objectives for the program: benefit low- and moderate-income persons, prevention or elimination of slums or blight, or address community development needs having a particular urgency because existing conditions pose a serious and immediate threat to the health or welfare of the community for which other funding is not available. N/A No https://www.hud.gov/program_offices/comm_planning/cdbg#:~:text=The%20Community%20Development%20Block%20Grant,%2D%20and%20moderate%2Dincome%20persons.
New Community Project Funding (CPF) To support a broad array of projects for infrastructure and community development. United States Congress U.S. House of Representatives Members of Congress will be allowed to submit 15 qualified, local projects to the Appropriations Committee for consideration of targeted federal funds. Members must provide evidence of community support for the projects, as well as compelling evidence that demonstrates a true need. N/A $7.5 billion for FY22; total funding for both Houses of Congress is limited to no more than 1% of discretionary spending N/A Over 4,000 (including Congressionally Directed Spending) N/A April 30, 2022 Consider tangible, community-supported projects that can substantially advance local climate action plans, such as a new transit hub, public transit system enhancement or extension, or major retrofit and electrification of public schools, public housing, or other community facilities. If resiliency and climate adaptation are of particular necessity, funding could be used to transform a stadium or convention center into a community resiliency hub. Learn more at: https://rmi.org/need-help-advancing-local-climate-action/ The broad flexibility of this funding could be transformative for communities that seek to overcome outdated transportation systems and building stocks, both of which present health and equity concerns. Many households struggle from America's historically car-centric development, where new or enhanced public transit could support non-White or lower income households, which are less likely to own a car, are more likely to commute via public transit, and are more likely to live in denser areas that suffer from greater vehicle pollutants. Communities also suffer from inefficient affordable housing options, where over 31 million households suffer from severe energy burdens. Energy burden rates are 43% higher for Black households than for non-Hispanic White households. Funding will be prioritized for projects that are shovel-ready and planning projects are eligible as well. In this first round of funding, projects were prioritized based on clear demonstrations of community support and compelling need. Coordinate early with your community's congressional delegation to ensure projects are aligned with delegation priorities and community needs. Each project must be for the current fiscal year only and cannot include multiyear funding. Note: Some representatives have abstained from participating in this request process. Check with your representative to confirm their participation and process. The structure is similar to what was previously known as "earmarks," which were discontinued in 2009. As this is new and subject to congressional direction, rules, requirements, and process may evolve each year. Funded projects can be found here: https://appropriations.house.gov/transparency No https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/Ag%20Request%20Guidance.pdf
New Congressionally Directed Spending (CDS) To support a broad array of projects for infrastructure and community development. United States Congress U.S. Senate Senators can submit an unlimited number of qualified, local projects to the Appropriations Committee for consideration of targeted federal funds. Members must submit their requests in writing and have no financial stake in awarded projects. N/A $7.5 billion for FY22; total funding for both Houses of Congress is limited to no more than 1% of discretionary spending N/A Over 4,000 (including Community Project Funding) N/A April 30, 2022 Consider tangible, community-supported projects that can substantially advance local climate action plans, such as a new transit hub, public transit system enhancement or extension, or major retrofit and electrification of public schools, public housing, or other community facilities. If resiliency and climate adaptation are of particular necessity, funding could be used to transform a stadium or convention center into a community resiliency hub. Learn more at: https://rmi.org/need-help-advancing-local-climate-action/ The broad flexibility of this funding could be transformative for communities that seek to overcome outdated transportation systems and building stocks, both of which present health and equity concerns. Many households struggle from America's historically car-centric development, where new or enhanced public transit could support non-White or lower income households, which are less likely to own a car, are more likely to commute via public transit, and are more likely to live in denser areas that suffer from greater vehicle pollutants. Communities also suffer from inefficient affordable housing options, where over 31 million households suffer from severe energy burdens. Energy burden rates are 43% higher for Black households than for non-Hispanic White households. Funding will be prioritized for projects that are shovel-ready and planning projects are eligible as well. In this first round of funding, projects were prioritized based on clear demonstrations of community support and compelling need. Coordinate early with your community's congressional delegation to ensure projects are aligned with delegation priorities and community needs. Each project must be for the current fiscal year only and cannot include multiyear funding. Note: Some representatives have abstained from participating in this request process. Check with your representative to confirm their participation and process. This is the first year this congressional program has existed. The structure is similar to what was previously known as "earmarks," which were discontinued in 2009. As this is new and subject to congressional direction, rules, requirements, and process may evolve each year. No https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/congressionally-directed-spending-requests
New - IRA Environmental and Climate Justice Block Grants To invest in community-led projects in disadvantaged communities and community capacity-building centers to address disproportionate environmental and public health harms related to pollution and climate change. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) TBA Eligible activities include 1) community-led air and other pollution monitoring, prevention, and remediation, and investments in low- and zero-emission and resilient technologies and related infrastructure and workforce development; 2) mitigating climate and health risks from urban heat islands, extreme heat, wood heater emissions, and wildfire events; 3) climate resiliency and adaptation; 4) reducing indoor toxics and indoor air pollution; or 5) facilitating engagement of disadvantaged communities in State and Federal advisory groups, workshops, rulemakings, and other public processes. TBA $3,000,000,000 N/A N/A N/A TBA Consider using grants flexibly for community initiatives that track and combat air pollution and urban heat, fund climate resiliency, and invest in access to nature, cleaner energy sources, and an electrified future. Partnerships with community-based nonprofit organizations are key to addressing environmental and climate justice. Under this program, applicants must establish partnerships with community-based nonprofit organizations. N/A $2,800,000,000 is available until September 30, 2026. Additional $200,000,000 is available for technical assistance. No
New Environmental Justice Small Grant (EJSG) Program To improve the environment and public health conditions of low-income communities and communities of color through the advancement of racial equity and environmental justice and address disproportionate environmental or public health harms and risks in minority populations or low-income populations under designated sections of environmental statutes. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Environmental Justice Eligible entities include non-profits, territories, tribal governments, and tribal organizations Not required $7,300,000 $75,000 100 $73,000 June 1, 2021 This funding includes special consideration tracks: priority programs include (1) Public Education, Training, Emergency Planning, and/or Investigations on Impacts of COVID-19 on Underserved Communities and Vulnerable Populations; and (2) Projects addressing Climate, Disaster Resiliency, and/or Emergency Preparedness. Consider exploring avenues to integrate clean energy opportunities such public education, training, surveys and studies, experiments, or demonstration projects incorporating green infrastructure. To address these multiple crises, this announcement places emphasis on projects focusing on COVID-19 impacts, as well as climate and disaster resiliency. Additionally, EPA is emphasizing projects addressing diesel pollution in underserved communities living near ports and railyards as part of EPA’s Ports Initiative (see details further described in this solicitation). Finally, to promote equitable accessibility to EPA grant funding and to assist small entities, approximately half of the total available funding under this announcement is intended to be reserved for small non-profit organizations with 10 or fewer full-time employees subject to the quality of applications received and other relevant considerations. Determine which program – the Environmental Justice Small Grants Program (EJSG) or the EJ Collaborative Problem Solving Program (EJCPS) which is issued separately – to apply for. Be aware, an applicant can receive a grant under only one of these programs – not both – so you need to carefully consider which one to apply for. While you are not prohibited from applying for both, you can only receive an award under one of them. In short, EJCPS funding under the other competition is designed for organizations that are more established and familiar with federal grants, while EJSG funding is designed for organizations that are: 1) more recently established and/or just starting out, 2) have smaller staffs and operating budgets, and/or 3) have never received a federal grant before. No https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=331855
Existing - Constant Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns (G3) Grant Program To help communities develop and implement plans that reduce stormwater runoff, increase the number and size of green spaces in urban areas, improve the health of local streams and the Chesapeake Bay, and enhance quality of life and community livability. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) EPA Region 3 & Chesapeake Bay Trust Funding can be applied anywhere in the Chesapeake Bay watershed portion of EPA Region 3 (excluding New York). Not required $490,000 Implementation: $100,000 Greening urban areas: $50,000 Planning and design: $30,000 6 $81,667 March 3, 2022 Consider enhancing urban and suburban tree canopies, especially where heat islands and flooding are more common. Trees can be strategically deployed to help cool pavement and buildings alike, reducing energy needs in particularly hot areas. Another strategy to mitigate both heat islands and flooding could be to deploy solar canopies on large parking surfaces as a part of a water catchment system, which would not only generate clean electricity but could be strategically designed to redirect rainfall into bioswales and other stormwater retention areas. Check out this example in Brooklyn, NY: https://betterbuildingssolutioncenter.energy.gov/showcase-projects/whole-foods-market-brooklyn-third-and-3rd Cooling communities that historically have hosted a disproportionate amount of heat-absorbing surface with fewer investments in greenery and parks can advance local equity and improve quality of life, especially during intense periods of heat. In many non-white neighborhoods, there has consistently been a lack of investment in green space and tree canopies. The NYTimes examined how racist housing policies continues to impact heat islands throughout the country: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/08/24/climate/racism-redlining-cities-global-warming.html Up to $15,000 for conceptual plans, up to $30,000 for engineered designs, up to $100,000 for implementation projects, up to $50,000 for community greening projects, up to $20,000 for white papers. Since 2010, the G3 Partnership has awarded 60 grants to Mid-Atlantic communities. These grants have infused over $4.9 million into green initiatives and resulted in over $9 million in G3 Projects. For additional information and case studies, visit: https://www.epa.gov/G3/g3-grant-fact-sheets No https://cbtrust.org/grants/green-streets-green-jobs-green-towns/
New - IRA Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund To assist communities in accelerating the deployment of low-carbon technologies and reducing or avoiding greenhouse gas emissions and other forms of air pollution. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) TBA Funding is designed to provide financing and technical assistance for clean energy and energy efficiency projects. Funding is available to states, municipalities, tribes, nonprofits, and other institutions. TBA $26,970,000,000 N/A N/A N/A No later than Spring 2023 To enhance the impact of decarbonization, consider combining clean energy projects with energy efficiency improvements, including weatherization and electrification measures. Local governments are also encouraged to collaborate with community-based organizations on public education about clean energy, zero-emission technology, and energy efficiency improvements. At least 60% of the funds will help provide clean energy financing in low-income and disadvantaged communities. Local governments are encouraged to connect directly with community-based organizations to identify and evaluate the urgent needs of low-income and disadvantaged communities and start engaging community members to help shape the project. This is largely considered to be a funding source for seeding green bank-type structures and investment partnerships. More guidance is forthcoming. $7,000,000,000 for zero-emission technology deployment, including rooftop and community solar, in low-income and disadvantaged communities; $11,970,000,000 available for broad investments in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and promoting environmental justice; $8,000,000,000 exclusively allocated to low-income and disadvantaged communities. No https://www.epw.senate.gov/public/_cache/files/2/6/26af3ca8-07f3-41ed-af31-ef0373ccc1b7/5CCB7EB412908BDFAB25C76463BDC27D.climate-and-equity-investments-in-the-inflation-reduction-act-5-.pdf
New - IIJA Healthy Streets Program To deploy cool and/or porous pavements and to expand tree cover to mitigate urban heat islands, improve air quality, and reduce the extent of impervious surfaces, storm water runoff and flood risks, and heat impacts to infrastructure and communities. Department of Transportation (DOT) TBA Eligible applicants include states, local governments, and metropolitan planning organizations (MPO), tribal governments, and nonprofits. 20% match required $100,000,000 $15,000,000 N/A N/A TBA Enhancing tree canopies can help mitigate heat islands and reduce energy needs during high temperatures. Tree canopy can also create a comfortable environment to encourage people to walk and bicycle to avoid carbon emissions. Funding can be used to conduct an assessment of urban heat islands effect and design and implement tree canopy plans for communities and neighborhoods. Grants will be prioritized for low-income or disadvantaged communities. Propose projects that can maximize the benefits by engaging the local community and/or partnering with community-based organizations. This joint UNEP/RMI handbook for local governments can guide planners with examples and best practices: https://rmi.org/insight/sustainable-urban-cooling-handbook/ $500,000,000 in funding eligible over five years. No
Existing - Constant Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) To fund state and tribal governments for the acquisition and development of public parks and other outdoor recreation sites. Department of Interior (DOI) National Park Service (NPS) Funding is provided to state and tribal governments to administer localized matching grant programs. All projects must be aligned with the priorities listed in their respective state's recreation plan (sometimes called a SCORP), which address the demand for and supply of recreation resources (local, state, and federal) within a state and identify needs and new opportunities for recreation improvements. 50% required unless otherwise specified Varies by state Varies by state Varies by state N/A Varies by state This funding is particularly used to support parks, land conservation, open space, and recreation. When possible, these funds can be optimized if building new trail connections that serve as both recreational assets as well as connections to existing transportation networks. Consider whether such funding makes sense to increase access with multi-modal options, offer new last-mile connectivity options for public transit users, or support expansions to pedestrian and bicycle trail networks (or build new ones where none previously existed). Additional focus on enhancing urban and suburban tree canopies could help mitigate heat islands. Trees can be strategically deployed to help cool pavement and buildings alike, reducing energy needs in particularly hot areas. Another strategy to mitigate both heat islands could be to deploy solar canopies over large recreational areas to offer shade and generate clean electricity for communities. Multi-modal accessibility to other transit options is particularly critical to ensure last-mile connections exist especially for currently disconnected, marginalized, and/or underserved communities. Consider how this funding can enhance last-mile connectivity options for those relying on public transit to increase safety and accessibility of continued commutes via transit. Each state has its own priorities and selection criteria (tailored to its own particular needs and unique opportunities), and because individual States make the decisions, in effect, about which projects will receive LWCF grants, the first step for potential applicants is to contact the cooperating State office to find out about local application deadlines, state priorities, and selection criteria. N/A No https://www.nps.gov/subjects/lwcf/planningprojects.htm
Existing - Increase Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) Outdoor Recreation Legacy Partnership Program To enable urban communities to create new outdoor recreation spaces, reinvigorate existing parks, and form connections between people and the outdoors in economically underserved communities. Projects should support locally led, voluntary conservation and restoration efforts that address the nature and climate crises, improve equitable access to the outdoors, and strengthen the economy. Department of Interior (DOI) National Park Service (NPS) The lead state agency may submit on behalf of themselves or another eligible sub-recipient. Eligible sub-recipients (i.e., project sponsors) include state agencies, local units of government (state political subdivisions such as cities, counties, and special-purpose districts such as park districts), and federally recognized Indian Tribes. For a project to be eligible the sub-recipient must: Represent a jurisdiction of at least 50,000 people, AND Be situated within or contiguous with the geographic boundary of one of the 497 Urbanized Areas (UA) delineated by the Census Bureau. 50% match required $192,000,000 $10,000,000 30 $6,400,000 May 31, 2023, but each state process/deadline will vary These projects must support the acquistion and/or development of outdoor recreational activities and faciliites. When possible, these funds can be optimized if building new trail connections that serve as both recreational assets as well as connections to existing transportation networks. Consider whether such funding makes sense to increase access with multi-modal options, offer new last-mile connectivity options for public transit users, or support expansions to pedestrian and bicycle trail networks (or build new ones where none previously existed). Additional focus on enhancing urban and suburban tree canopies could help mitigate heat islands. Trees can be strategically deployed to help cool pavement and buildings alike, reducing energy needs in particularly hot areas. Another strategy to mitigate both heat islands could be to deploy solar canopies over large recreational areas to offer shade and generate clean electricity for communities.also be public access, however, access may be controlled, but not prohibited. Projects must be directly located in communities that are low-income and lack adequate parks or other outdoor recreation spaces. Priority will be given to projects that engage members of the targeted economically disadvantaged community in all aspects of the development and implementation the project. Each state has its own priorities and selection criteria (tailored to its own particular needs and unique opportunities), and because individual States make the decisions, in effect, about which projects will receive these grants. The first step for potential applicants is to contact the cooperating State office to find out about local application deadlines, state priorities, and selection criteria. Ensuring your project aligns with State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) will be key to a competitive application at both the state and federal levels. In 2021, the Department of Interior opened the ORLP grant program to more communities by removing the cap on the number of proposals states can submit on behalf of local jurisdictions and by increasing the maximum grant from $1 million to $5 million. No https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=342812
New - IRA Neighborhood Access and Equity Grant Program To support neighborhood equity, safety, and affordable transportation access with competitive grants to reconnect communities divided by existing infrastructure barriers, mitigate negative impacts of transportation facilities or construction projects on disadvantaged or underserved communities, and support equitable transportation planning and community engagement activities. Department of Transportation (DOT) Federal Highway Administration (FHA) Eligible applicants include states, local governments, territories, and metropolitan planning organizations (MPO), Tribal governments, and nonprofits. 20% match required, except for projects in disadvantaged or underserved communities $3,205,000,000 N/A N/A N/A TBA When connecting divided communities, consider more protected, resilient transit stops, EV charging infrastructure, safe and secure bicycle parking, and incorporating nature-based heat island mitigation strategies to make walking, cycling, and using public transit safer, more connected, and more sustainable. Funding reserved for economically disadvantaged communities are for communities that are 1) economically disadvantaged, underserved, or located in an area of persistent poverty; 2) have entered or will enter into a community benefits agreement with representatives of the community, 3) have an anti-displacement policy, a community land trust, or a community advisory board in effect; or 4) has demonstrated a plan for employing residents in the area impacted by the activity or project proposed. Consider both projects that remove dividing elements and enhnace new access opportunities. This may include relocating or redirecting a major road or highway as well as making it easier for riders to access transit. $1,893,000,000 is available until September 30, 2026. Additional $1,262,000,000 is available for economically disadvantaged communities. $50,000,000 is available for technical assistance. No
Existing - Constant Regional Forest Economy Partnership (RFEP) Program To assist rural communities, institutes of higher education and research, and economic development organizations in their efforts to transition the forest-based industry and its workforce to a focus on new technologies and viable business models across the 4-state region of Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont. Northern Border Regional Commission N/A Applicants must be in an eligible county across the 4-state region: Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont. 20-50% match required, depending on county economic status (0% local match accepted in FY21 if constrained by COVID-19) $4,000,000 $1,000,000 5 $800,000 Expected 3rd quarter 2022 Program focuses on forest industry and associated workforce development. This includes new technology and innovations that seek to find new uses for forest products and evolve traditional forest economy business models into those that can create sustainable future commercial markets and opportunities. Decarbonization options may include, where appropriate, carbon sequestration and offset projects, use of biomass/wood products for energy and heat, and improvements to energy efficiency and resilience of forest industrial operations, downstream businesses, and related operations. The Commission is required to annually assess the level of socioeconomic distress among the counties in its service area. Counties are designated as either Distressed, Transitional, or Attainment. “Distressed” counties are those that “have high rates of poverty, unemployment, or outmigration” and “are the most severely and persistently economic distressed and underdeveloped.” The NBRC is required to allocate 50% of total Appropriations to projects in counties falling within this designation. Commission grants within Distressed Counties only require a 20% match. Unlike other NBRC programs, this program emphasizes the regional significance of a project and its context within the broader regional economy. Applicants should state whether (and if so, how) the project is complementary to a comprehensive regional plan, and/or statewide economic development priorities. Past projects also include conversion of former mill sites into industrial parks and business incubators, construction of workforce housing, adaptive reuses of historic properties, and upgraded facilities to support forestry businesses. For more information on prior awardees, see here: https://www.nbrc.gov/userfiles/files/2021_RFEP_Documents/Regional%20Forest%20Economy%20Partnership%20Awards.pdf No https://www.nbrc.gov/content/RFEP_2021
Existing - Constant Section 108 Loan To provide communities a source of financing for economic development, housing rehabilitation, public facilities, and large-scale physical development projects. This is the loan guarantee provision of the CDBG Program allowing communities to leverage portions of their CDBG funds for federally guaranteed loans large enough to pursue physical and economic revitalization projects capable of redeveloping entire neighborhoods. Financing infrastructure with Section 108 Loans Section 108 loans may be used to finance the construction, reconstruction, relocation, clearance, or installation of public facilities including street, sidewalk, and other site improvements that are part of the overall project. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) Community Planning and Development CDBG funds may be used for activities that include, but are not limited to: acquisition of real property, relocation and demolition, rehabilitation of residential and non-residential structures, construction of public facilities and improvements, such as water and sewer facilities, streets, neighborhood centers, and the conversion of school buildings for eligible purposes, public services, within certain limits, activities relating to energy conservation and renewable energy resources, provision of assistance to profit-motivated businesses to carry out economic development and job creation/retention activities. Borrower is required to secure the loan by pledging current and future CDBG allocations to repay and secure the loan. Current Availability of Section 108 Financing - CDBG Entitlement and State Grantees: https://www.hudexchange.info/resource/5197/current-availability-of-section-108-financing-cdbg-entitlement-and-state-grantees/ Loan amount can be up to 5X the CDBG annual allocation Varies by municipality and state Varies by municipality and state In parallel to CDBG funding cycle Section 108's unique flexibility and range of applications make it one of the most potent and important public investment tools that HUD offers to state and local governments. It is often used to catalyze private economic activity in underserved areas in cities and counties across the nation or to fill a financing gap in an important community project. The program's flexible repayment terms also make it ideal for layering with other sources of community and economic development financing including, but not limited to, New Markets Tax Credits (NMTC), Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), and Opportunity Zone equity investments. Consider utilizing these funds to influence decarbonization across the power, buildings, and transportation sectors for clean energy and efficiency programs, building retrofits and weatherization, and multi-modal transportation projects that will enhance the safety, resiliency, and air quality of communities. The project must benefit low-moderate income communities and census tracts. The HUD CPD Map Tool may be used to identify low-income census tracts along with other demographic information. One of the best uses of the Section 108 Program is to provide gap financing for projects that promote business growth and create jobs. Visit the Consolidated Plan Process, Grant Programs, and related HUD programs pages for more information. Before considering borrowing against your community's CDBG allocation, discuss current uses of such funds with your local or state administrators of CDBG funding. If already carved out for different purposes, this may not be a viable option. Like CDBG, each activity must meet one of the following national objectives for the program: benefit low- and moderate-income persons, prevention or elimination of slums or blight, or address community development needs having a particular urgency because existing conditions pose a serious and immediate threat to the health or welfare of the community for which other funding is not available. For more information on the HUD Section 108 Loan Guarantee process and typical timelines, see: https://files.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/Overview-HUD-Section-108-Loan-Guarantee-Process-and-Typical-Associated-Timelines.pdf No https://www.hud.gov/program_offices/comm_planning/section108
New - IRA State and Private Forestry Conservation Programs To provide competitive grants to eligible entities for tree planting and related activities. Department of Agriculture (USDA) TBA Eligible recipients include state agencies, local governmental entities, tribal governmental entities, and nonprofits. TBA $1,500,000,000 N/A N/A N/A TBA Extensive and strategic planting of native and resilient trees, especially in denser, more developed areas, can reduce cooling needs and serve as a system energy efficiency strategy. Consider engaging with disadvantaged communities to ensure access to green space is expanded to all community members and does not interfere with existing or desired uses. Also consider prioritizing tree plantings in communities struggling with urban heat islands. N/A N/A No
Existing - Increase Urban and Community Forestry (UCF) Program To provide technical, financial, research and educational services for communities to conserve, restore, and enhance urban forests. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) United States Forest Service Eligible applicants include non-profits, educational institutions of higher learning, local governments, municipalities, tribal organizations, and state organizations representing multi-state or national proposals. 50% match required $1,000,000 $500,000 5 $200,000 April 8, 2022 Consider enhancing urban and suburban tree canopies, especially where heat islands and flooding are more common. Urban forestry needs to be strategically deployed and well managed to help reduce energy use, mitigate disasters and promote human health. It is important to include and/or address underserved communities and their needs. The Council seeks to fund proposals that clearly broaden the base of participation through the involvement of such non-traditional partnerships and the inclusion of underserved communities with applicable local, state and/or national urban forestry contacts. Applicants should consider multi-year projects and other sources of funds, which may include other Federal cooperative conservation sources. While other Federal dollars or technical support may contribute to the project, they may not be used to match these Federal grant program dollars. Each year, grant categories vary. All grant categories align with one or more of the goals in the National Ten Year Urban and Community Forestry Action Plan (2016-2026). See this resource here: https://urbanforestplan.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/FinalActionPlan_Complete_11_17_15.pdf The grant review process takes about nine months to a year to review the proposals once they are received. In addition to research and tool development projects led by educational institutions of higher learning, selected grant proposals also include network development to achieve a broader impact across multiple cities with the intention to replicate the program in the future. Selected Grant Proposals of 2020 can be found here: https://www.fs.usda.gov/managing-land/urban-forests/ucf/2020-nufrigp No https://www.fs.usda.gov/managing-land/urban-forests/ucf
  • To provide quick, targeted technical assistance to selected communities to contribute environmental and economic sustainability, using a variety of tools that have demonstrated results and widespread application.
  • To invest in and undertake hazard mitigation projects, reducing the risks communities face from disasters and natural hazards.
  • To support those communities that have undergone a comprehensive local planning process and are ready to implement their “Transformation Plan” to redevelop the neighborhood.
  • To support the development of comprehensive neighborhood revitalization plans which focused on directing resources to address three core goals: Housing, People and Neighborhoods. The Transformation Plan will become the guiding document for the revitalization of the public and/or assisted housing units while simultaneously directing the transformation of the surrounding neighborhood and positive outcomes for families.
  • To support a technology-neutral approach to planning and implementation of greenhouse gas pollution reduction strategies.
  • To help cities, counties, and states recover from Presidentially-declared disasters. The grants focus on low-income areas, subject to availability of supplemental appropriations.
  • To develop viable urban communities by providing decent housing, a suitable living environment, and expand economic opportunities for low- and moderate-income persons.
  • To support a broad array of projects for infrastructure and community development.
  • To support a broad array of projects for infrastructure and community development.
  • To invest in community-led projects in disadvantaged communities and community capacity-building centers to address disproportionate environmental and public health harms related to pollution and climate change.
  • To improve the environment and public health conditions of low-income communities and communities of color through the advancement of racial equity and environmental justice and address disproportionate environmental or public health harms and risks in minority populations or low-income populations under designated sections of environmental statutes.
  • To help communities develop and implement plans that reduce stormwater runoff, increase the number and size of green spaces in urban areas, improve the health of local streams and the Chesapeake Bay, and enhance quality of life and community livability.
  • To assist communities in accelerating the deployment of low-carbon technologies and reducing or avoiding greenhouse gas emissions and other forms of air pollution.
  • To deploy cool and/or porous pavements and to expand tree cover to mitigate urban heat islands, improve air quality, and reduce the extent of impervious surfaces, storm water runoff and flood risks, and heat impacts to infrastructure and communities.
  • To fund state and tribal governments for the acquisition and development of public parks and other outdoor recreation sites.
  • To enable urban communities to create new outdoor recreation spaces, reinvigorate existing parks, and form connections between people and the outdoors in economically underserved communities. Projects should support locally led, voluntary conservation and restoration efforts that address the nature and climate crises, improve equitable access to the outdoors, and strengthen the economy.
  • To support neighborhood equity, safety, and affordable transportation access with competitive grants to reconnect communities divided by existing infrastructure barriers, mitigate negative impacts of transportation facilities or construction projects on disadvantaged or underserved communities, and support equitable transportation planning and community engagement activities.
  • To assist rural communities, institutes of higher education and research, and economic development organizations in their efforts to transition the forest-based industry and its workforce to a focus on new technologies and viable business models across the 4-state region of Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont.
  • To provide communities a source of financing for economic development, housing rehabilitation, public facilities, and large-scale physical development projects. This is the loan guarantee provision of the CDBG Program allowing communities to leverage portions of their CDBG funds for federally guaranteed loans large enough to pursue physical and economic revitalization projects capable of redeveloping entire neighborhoods. Financing infrastructure with Section 108 Loans Section 108 loans may be used to finance the construction, reconstruction, relocation, clearance, or installation of public facilities including street, sidewalk, and other site improvements that are part of the overall project.
  • To provide competitive grants to eligible entities for tree planting and related activities.
  • To provide technical, financial, research and educational services for communities to conserve, restore, and enhance urban forests.
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