FFOLD - American Cities Climate Challenge
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Funding Guidance

Federal Funding Opportunities for Local Decarbonization

Navigating federal funding for local climate action and making strategic decisions on how to best pursue opportunities can be overwhelming and challenging. This tool helps local governments prioritize and leverage existing federal funding to advance system-wide energy transition goals—from block grants and technical assistance to competitive grants and loans. Use the filters below to filter available funding sources automatically and focus on the funding sources relevant to your project, goals, and community.

Scope

This tool, Federal Funding Opportunities for Local Decarbonization (FFOLD), focuses on energy sector emissions, including electricity, transportation, buildings, and resilient energy systems. It does not explicitly capture funding for other sustainability solutions. FFOLD focuses on programs for state, local, and tribal entities. Local agencies/authorities generally include cities, counties, towns, public utility providers, transit agencies, airports, ports, and local educational agencies (e.g. school districts).For additional clarifications and definitions, download FFOLD and refer to the Glossary of Terms tab.

Updates

FFOLD will be updated on a quarterly basis until otherwise noted. This version of FFOLD was last updated September 23, 2022.

Equity Considerations

A companion piece to this tool—”Equity Design Considerations for Federal Funding“—lists resources to help FFOLD users and broader audiences pursue equitable climate action, project design, and planning.

Methodology

Funding sources were identified and incorporated into this tool based upon two main factors: 1) applicant eligibility for state, local, and tribal entities; and 2) activity eligibility for decarbonization projects and initiatives that are either explicitly described and/or potentially allowed under the programmatic rules and agency guidance. This tool incorporates research and reviews of agency websites, the Federal Register, Grants.gov, and federal legislation. Contact Matthew Popkin (mpopkin@rmi.org) or Alex Dane (alex.dane@wri.org) with any questions or feedback.

Displaying 23 out of 204 Funding Opportunities
New or Existing Program Name Purpose Agency Sub-Department Eligibility Requirements Matching Funding Available Max Award Expected Allocations Average Award Deadline Decarbonization Considerations Equity Considerations Helpful Tips Other Notes Only for Federal Emergency Declaration? Webpage
Existing - IIJA Increase Brownfields Multipurpose (MP) Grants To provide grant funding for a range of eligible purposes, including developing inventories of brownfield sites, prioritizing sites, engaging community stakeholders, conducting assessments, developing cleanup and reuse plans for key sites, conducting cleanup activities, and developing a revitalization plan. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization All applicants must meet the "threshold criteria" as outlined in the updated notice of funding opportunity. Not required $14,000,000 $800,000 17 $823,529 November 22, 2022 Transforming underutilized or abandoned sites in your community into revitalized energy hubs can also spur economic revitalization. These funds are meant to be transformative in efficiently addressing multiple stages of project redevelopment. Such funding could help communities inventory and prioritize brownfield sites for hosting renewable energy and develop cleanup plans, if needed, as well as reuse and revitalization plans. Funding could also help plan, assess, cleanup, and reinvent a larger industrial site for new clean energy manufacturing. Large brownfield sites can be future hubs for new manufacturing and clean energy jobs and offer opportunities to improve distributional equity where communities were previously neglected. Funding can be specifically used to conduct community engagement activities. This program has typically been offered every two years, unlike the annually recurring assessment, cleanup, and revolving loan fund grants. These are highly competitive projects geared at sites with the most compelling reuse. EPA's RE-Powering America's Land program offers detailed reports, case studies, and guidance for those looking to deploy renewable energy on brownfields: https://www.epa.gov/re-powering EPA requests that, if applicable, the applicant describe how the reuse of the priority site(s) will facilitate renewable energy from wind, solar, or geothermal energy; or will incorporate energy efficiency measures. For more information on clean energy reuse options, check out EPA's RE-Powering America's Lands initiative. No https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/brownfields-multipurpose-grants
Existing - IIJA Increase Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) To invest in and undertake hazard mitigation projects, reducing the risks communities face from disasters and natural hazards. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Local governments/municipalities are eligible to apply as sub-applicants to states. Homeowners, business operators, and non-profit organizations cannot apply directly to FEMA but can be included in a sub-application submitted by an eligible sub-applicant. Note: Applicants must have a FEMA-approved State, Local, or Tribal Hazard Mitigation Plan by the application deadline and at the time of obligation of grant funds. 25% match required, unless applicant is economically disadvantaged rural community $2,300,000,000 TBA 125 $18,400,000 January 27, 2023; state deadlines vary (see "Helpful Tips") BRIC is designed to advance broad, impactful, flexible, and innovative resiliency solutions that enhance the energy system and access to energy during disasters. For FY 2022, the priorities for the program are to incentivize natural hazard risk reduction activities that mitigate risk to public infrastructure and disadvantaged communities; incorporate nature-based solutions including those designed to reduce carbon emissions; enhance climate resilience and adaptation; and increase funding to applicants that facilitate the adoption and enforcement of the latest published editions of building codes. BRIC encourages hazard mitigation projects that meet multiple program priorities. BRIC has a priority focus of benefiting disadvantaged communities, defined as those facing conditions including, but not limited to, low income, high and/or persistent poverty, high unemployment/underemployment, racial and ethnic segregation, high housing cost burdens, distressed neighborhoods, disproportionate impacts from climate change, high energy cost burden and low energy access, jobs lost from the energy transition, and limited access to healthcare. Flexible backup power solutions (i.e. local community resiliency hubs) can be deployed to support remote, marginalized residents with limited access to more centralized facilities. State deadlines will vary for sub-applicants to be considered, typically 1-3 months prior to the FEMA deadline. Contact your State Hazard Mitigation Officer (SHMO) to learn about potential state deadline to plan accordingly: https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/state-contacts In addition to project selections, the BRIC Program offers help to communities in the form non-financial Direct Technical Assistance (DTA). Read more here: https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/building-resilient-infrastructure-communities/direct-technical-assistance For past program details, see here: https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/building-resilient-infrastructure-communities/after-apply/fy-2021-subapplication-status No https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/building-resilient-infrastructure-communities
New - IIJA Clean Energy Demonstration Program on Current and Former Mine Land To demonstrate the technical and economic viability of clean energy projects on current and former mines. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Clean Energy Demonstrations (OCED) At least 2 projects must be solar. Others projects can be solar, micro-grid, geothermal, direct air capture, fossil fuel generated electricity with carbon capture/utilization/sequestration, energy storage (including pumped storage hydropower and compressed air storage), and advanced nuclear technology. TBA $500,000,000 TBA 5 $100,000,000 Estimated application opening date in 2023. Net impact on greenhouse gas emissions is one prioritization criteria used by the DOE. This is a demonstration project seeking projects that can be deployed and scaled quickly to other mine lands while having large net impacts on reducing greenhouse gas emissions are strong candidates for this demonstration program. Job creation in economically distressed areas or in energy transition communities is one prioritization criteria. Community and worker consultation should be incorporated into any project planning, design, and implementation. "Reasonable expectation of commercial viability", as determined by the Secretary, is one of the project eligibility criteria. Prioritization criteria include: job creation, particularly in economically distressed areas and dislocated workers previously employed in manufacturing, coal power plants, or coal mining; net impact in avoiding or reducing greenhouse gas emissions; lowest levelized cost of generated or stored energy; greatest potential for technological innovation and deployment; and shortest project time from permitting to completion. MINE LAND.—The term ‘‘mine land’’ means— (A) land subject to titles IV and V of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (30 U.S.C. 1231 et seq.; 30 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.); and (B) land that has been claimed or patented subject to sections 2319 through 2344 of the Revised Statutes (commonly known as the ‘‘Mining Law of 1872’’) (30 U.S.C. 22 et seq.) No https://www.energy.gov/bil/clean-energy-demonstration-program-current-and-former-mine-land
New - IRA Climate Pollution Reduction Grants (Climate Pollution Plans and Implementation Grants) To support a technology-neutral approach to planning and implementation of greenhouse gas pollution reduction strategies. TBA TBA Funding is available for states, territories, DC, tribes, and municipalities to develop and implement greenhouse gas emissions reduction plans. TBA $5,000,000,000 N/A N/A N/A No later than Summer 2023 Consider tangible, community-supported plans and efforts that can substantially reduce emissions, such as public transit system enhancement or extension, or major retrofit and electrification of public schools, and public housing. Consider prioritizing projects that are located in economically and environmentally distressed communities, and maximizing the long-term benefits for residents of the region. Local governments are encouraged to integrate community benefits into project scopes and milestones. Municipal departments/agencies are encouraged to work together to develop comprehensive emission reduction plans. Consider leveraging private investment to expand efforts. $250,000,000 is for planning activities and $4,750,000,000 is for implementation grants. No
Existing - Constant Connected Communities (CC) To expand DOE’s network of grid-interactive efficient building communities nationwide and demonstrate the ability of groups of buildings and distributed energy resources (DERs) to provide cost effective grid services through demand flexibility and efficiency that maximize use of renewable resources and reduce emissions, while maintaining (if not enhancing) occupant satisfaction and productivity. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (BTO), and Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) Municipal and tribal entities are eligible prime recipients. Other organizations, including for-profit entities, non-profits, and educational entities, are eligible as both prime recipients and subrecipients. 30% match required $65,000,000 $7,000,000 10 $6,500,000 March 17, 2021 The Connected Communities funding program selects projects that will demonstrate how groups of buildings combined with other types of distributed energy resources (DERs), such as electric vehicle (EV) charging and photovoltaic (PV) generation, can reliably and cost‐effectively serve as grid assets by strategically deploying efficiency and demand flexibility. Considerations for projects include transforming multi-family buildings in affordable housing developments into grid-interactive efficient buildings (GEBs) to optimize buildings and distributed energy resources to maintain the comfort of the building occupants, lower utility bills, and reduce grid system costs. Projects focusing on historically underserved neighborhoods to reduce their energy burden and increase community resiliency are encouraged.. Find the full funding opportunity on the EERE Exchange website: https://eere-exchange.energy.gov/Default.aspx#FoaId9d24afcd-e292-4ea2-a4d3-d36e2b9dd9c7 To learn more about "Connected Communities"-related research, see this resource here: https://connectedcommunities.lbl.gov/ The announcement of funded projects for 2021 can be found here: https://www.energy.gov/articles/doe-invests-61-million-smart-buildings-accelerate-renewable-energy-adoption-and-grid No https://www.energy.gov/eere/solar/funding-opportunity-announcement-connected-communities
New Energyshed: Exploring Place-Based Generation To invest in innovative research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects that accelerate the large-scale development and deployment of renewable energy to support an equitable transition to a decarbonized electricity system by 2035 and net-zero emissions economy by 2050. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Eligible applicants include 1) individuals; 2) domestic for-profit entities, educational institutions, nonprofits; 3) state, local, and tribal governments; 4) foreign entities. 20% match required $10,000,000 $5,000,000 2-5 $2,500,000 August 1, 2022 Successful projects are expected to show the impacts and tradeoffs of developing locally-derived clean energy generation under a range of future scenarios, including increasing EV charging needs and future heating electrification. Consider partnering with underrepresented groups to understand the needs of underserved communities and developing tools to address the renewable energy gap. Engage multiple stakeholders to address gaps in diversity, equity, inclusion, and various considerations described in the FOA. To help a broad set of stakeholders understand the implications and participate in the development of locally-based energy generation in their community, these tools should be accessible and easy-to-use to a wide array of stakeholders that are not necessarily electric power system experts. N/A N/A No https://www.energy.gov/eere/funding-opportunity-announcement-energyshed-exploring-place-based-generation
New - IRA Environmental and Climate Justice Block Grants To invest in community-led projects in disadvantaged communities and community capacity-building centers to address disproportionate environmental and public health harms related to pollution and climate change. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) TBA Eligible activities include 1) community-led air and other pollution monitoring, prevention, and remediation, and investments in low- and zero-emission and resilient technologies and related infrastructure and workforce development; 2) mitigating climate and health risks from urban heat islands, extreme heat, wood heater emissions, and wildfire events; 3) climate resiliency and adaptation; 4) reducing indoor toxics and indoor air pollution; or 5) facilitating engagement of disadvantaged communities in State and Federal advisory groups, workshops, rulemakings, and other public processes. TBA $3,000,000,000 N/A N/A N/A TBA Consider using grants flexibly for community initiatives that track and combat air pollution and urban heat, fund climate resiliency, and invest in access to nature, cleaner energy sources, and an electrified future. Partnerships with community-based nonprofit organizations are key to addressing environmental and climate justice. Under this program, applicants must establish partnerships with community-based nonprofit organizations. N/A $2,800,000,000 is available until September 30, 2026. Additional $200,000,000 is available for technical assistance. No
New - IIJA Federal Share Flexibility Pilot Program To give up to 10 States additional flexibility to determine the Federal share on a project, multiple-project, or program basis for projects under any of the following funded under the National Highway Performance Program, the Surface Transportation Block Grant Program, the Highway Safety Improvement Program, the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program National Highway Freight Program, the Carbon Reduction Program, and the PROTECT grant program. Department of Transportation (DOT) N/A All states are eligible for this program. Not required N/A N/A 10 N/A TBA This pilot program allows participating states to reduce cost sharing requirements for various decarbonization programs offered by DOT, shifting up to 100% of project costs to the federal government. This pilot program could encourage less-resourced states to participate in DOT decarbonization programs, not just those that can afford cost matches. Based on the programs referenced, US territories and Tribal governments may be eligible to apply, but that should be confirmed with the administrators and/or Secretary prior to proceeding. N/A N/A No
New - IIJA Grants for Energy Efficiency Improvements and Renewable Energy Improvements at Public School Facilities To make energy efficiency, renewable energy, and alternative fueled vehicle upgrades and improvements at public schools. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Eligible entities include local educational entities; nonprofit, for-profit, and community organizations that have the knowledge and capacity to assist with energy improvements. See notes for more information on eligible project types. TBA $500,000,000 TBA TBA TBA Expected 4rd quarter 2022 Eligible projects include energy efficiency (envelope, HVAC, lighting, controls, etc.), ventilation, renewable energy, alternative vehicles, and alternative fuel vehicle infrastructure improvements. Electric vehicles should be prioritized over other alternative fuel sources such as propane. Schools and their project partners should evaluate current emission profiles associated with their building stock, electricity use and generation sources, and student transportation and prioritize projects with the greatest greenhouse gas mitigation potential. Rural schools and schools that serve a high percentage of students receiving a free and reduced price lunch are prioritized. Projects which improve building performance and energy efficiency may also improve indoor air quality. When evaluating school bus and student transportation projects, replacing older diesel buses which were manufactured prior to updated EPA regulations will have greater impacts on both greenhouse gas and conventional air pollutant emissions for students, workers, and surrounding communities. Secretary shall give priority to an eligible entity— (A) that has renovation, repair, and improvement funding needs; (B)(i) that, as determined by the Secretary, serves a high percentage of students, including students in a high school in accordance with paragraph (2), who are eligible for a free or reduced price lunch under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq.); or (ii) the partnering local educational agency of which is designated with a school district locale code of 41, 42, or 43 [indicating rural locations], as determined by the National Center for Education Statistics in consultation with the Bureau of the Census; and (C) that leverages private sector investment through energy-related performance contracting. Eligible projects include projects that result in a direct reduction in school energy costs; leads to an improvement in teacher and student health, including indoor air quality and achieves energy savings; involves the installation of renewable energy technologies; installs alternative fueled vehicle infrastructure on school grounds for exclusive use of school buses or the general public; the purchase or lease of alternative fueled vehicles to be used by a school. No https://www.energy.gov/bil/grants-energy-efficiency-and-renewable-energy-improvements-public-school-facilities
Existing - Constant Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns (G3) Grant Program To help communities develop and implement plans that reduce stormwater runoff, increase the number and size of green spaces in urban areas, improve the health of local streams and the Chesapeake Bay, and enhance quality of life and community livability. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) EPA Region 3 & Chesapeake Bay Trust Funding can be applied anywhere in the Chesapeake Bay watershed portion of EPA Region 3 (excluding New York). Not required $490,000 Implementation: $100,000 Greening urban areas: $50,000 Planning and design: $30,000 6 $81,667 March 3, 2022 Consider enhancing urban and suburban tree canopies, especially where heat islands and flooding are more common. Trees can be strategically deployed to help cool pavement and buildings alike, reducing energy needs in particularly hot areas. Another strategy to mitigate both heat islands and flooding could be to deploy solar canopies on large parking surfaces as a part of a water catchment system, which would not only generate clean electricity but could be strategically designed to redirect rainfall into bioswales and other stormwater retention areas. Check out this example in Brooklyn, NY: https://betterbuildingssolutioncenter.energy.gov/showcase-projects/whole-foods-market-brooklyn-third-and-3rd Cooling communities that historically have hosted a disproportionate amount of heat-absorbing surface with fewer investments in greenery and parks can advance local equity and improve quality of life, especially during intense periods of heat. In many non-white neighborhoods, there has consistently been a lack of investment in green space and tree canopies. The NYTimes examined how racist housing policies continues to impact heat islands throughout the country: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/08/24/climate/racism-redlining-cities-global-warming.html Up to $15,000 for conceptual plans, up to $30,000 for engineered designs, up to $100,000 for implementation projects, up to $50,000 for community greening projects, up to $20,000 for white papers. Since 2010, the G3 Partnership has awarded 60 grants to Mid-Atlantic communities. These grants have infused over $4.9 million into green initiatives and resulted in over $9 million in G3 Projects. For additional information and case studies, visit: https://www.epa.gov/G3/g3-grant-fact-sheets No https://cbtrust.org/grants/green-streets-green-jobs-green-towns/
New - IRA Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund To assist communities in accelerating the deployment of low-carbon technologies and reducing or avoiding greenhouse gas emissions and other forms of air pollution. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) TBA Funding is designed to provide financing and technical assistance for clean energy and energy efficiency projects. Funding is available to states, municipalities, tribes, nonprofits, and other institutions. TBA $26,970,000,000 N/A N/A N/A No later than Spring 2023 To enhance the impact of decarbonization, consider combining clean energy projects with energy efficiency improvements, including weatherization and electrification measures. Local governments are also encouraged to collaborate with community-based organizations on public education about clean energy, zero-emission technology, and energy efficiency improvements. At least 60% of the funds will help provide clean energy financing in low-income and disadvantaged communities. Local governments are encouraged to connect directly with community-based organizations to identify and evaluate the urgent needs of low-income and disadvantaged communities and start engaging community members to help shape the project. This is largely considered to be a funding source for seeding green bank-type structures and investment partnerships. More guidance is forthcoming. $7,000,000,000 for zero-emission technology deployment, including rooftop and community solar, in low-income and disadvantaged communities; $11,970,000,000 available for broad investments in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and promoting environmental justice; $8,000,000,000 exclusively allocated to low-income and disadvantaged communities. No https://www.epw.senate.gov/public/_cache/files/2/6/26af3ca8-07f3-41ed-af31-ef0373ccc1b7/5CCB7EB412908BDFAB25C76463BDC27D.climate-and-equity-investments-in-the-inflation-reduction-act-5-.pdf
Existing - Constant H2 at Scale Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Eligible project topic areas may vary by year. In 2020, there were 6 eligible topic areas for projects, which can be viewed here: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=h2 Yes, match required $64,000,000 $9,000,000 21 $3,047,619 Summer 2021 Consider industry, university, and/or utility partnerships that can collaboratively support pilot deployments of hydrogen-based technologies. Major use cases may include heavy manufacturing, large vehicles (freight, trucks, buses, etc.), and energy storage. Note that funding can be used to support training and workforce development for emerging hydrogen technologies. Consider for whom and where such programs could be developed to increase access to or build on local university or community college training programs already. Prior to applying for funding, consider forming a task force or regional group focused on aligning the most promising use cases for hydrogen deployment and with local climate action plans. Previous recipients were predominantly private companies or universities. 2021 funding solicitation has not yet been announced, but you can find the selected recipients from 2020 here: https://www.energy.gov/sites/default/files/2020/07/f76/hfto-h2-at-scale-new-markets-foa-selections-for-release.pdf No https://www.energy.gov/eere/fuelcells/h2scale
New Micro-grid and Integrated Micro-grid Systems Program To promote the development of integrated micro-grid systems for isolated communities and micro-grid systems to increase the resilience of critical infrastructure. Focus on micro-grid systems owned or operated by isolated communities, rural electric co-operatives, and municipal governments. Department of Energy (DOE) N/A Eligible entities include states, Indian Tribes, regional entities and regulators, local units of government, institutions of higher education, and private sector entities. Yes, match required $15,000,000 $500,000 20 $750,000 New program, deadline unknown. Decarbonization strategies may include increased use of carbon-free generating sources and energy storage systems in microgrids, reduction of reliance on fossil-fuel-based generating sources including diesel, and projects which increase community resilience to disasters. For purposes of this section, the term ‘‘isolated community’’ means a community that is powered by a stand-alone electric generation and distribution system without the economic and reliability benefits of connection to a regional electric grid. Additional emphasis is given for isolated communities exposed to extreme weather conditions and high energy costs, including electricity, space heating and cooling, and transportation. Policymakers may consider prioritizing communities that 1) experience frequent service interruptions and reliability concerns, particularly those that are related to disasters including but not limited to wildfires, floods, and hurricanes; and 2) communities in which a large share of households face a high energy burden. Consider also incorporating local workforce training, development, and retention as part of this program. For purposes of this section, the term ‘‘integrated micro-grid system’’ means a micro-grid system that— (A) comprises generation from both conventional and renewable energy resources; and (B) may use grid-scale energy storage In carrying out the program, the DOE Secretary shall consider the capacity of the local workforce to operate, maintain, and repair a integrated micro-grid system as well as opportunities to improve that capacity. Funding expires in 2025. No https://www.energy.senate.gov/services/files/32B4E9F4-F13A-44F6-A0CA-E10B3392D47A
Existing - Constant Multipurpose Grants (MPG) To address important environmental priorities under existing statutes, such as advancing environmental justice and tackling climate change, including development and enforcement of regulations requiring that sources of contamination clean up and remediate affected areas; pre-cleanup and pre-remediation activities such as site assessment and sampling; and public outreach for site-specific work. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) N/A Eligible recipients are generally state agencies that carry out the federally funded environmental programs. There is a 15% funding carve-out for rural communities. Not required $10,000,000 N/A N/A N/A July 9, 2021 While this program is not explicitly focused on reducing emissions for energy-systems, states and tribes could still plan, assess, survey, and conduct other activities to advance renewable energy siting on brownfields and other site preparation or cleanup activities that can accelerate the reuse of important community sites for renewable energy, energy storage, transit centers, or vehicle charging hubs. Cleaning up contaminated sites of any size often yields immediate environmental and human health, environmental justice benefit, and distributional equity benefits. This year, EPA seems to be prioritizing using funds to address per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). States who submit workplans or workplan amendments consistent with the multipurpose grant guidance and approved by their respective EPA Region will receive the full amount for which they are eligible. No https://www.epa.gov/grants/multipurpose-grants-states-and-tribes
Existing - Decrease National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A) Impact Grant Program To help mitigate adverse impacts related to oil and gas development within the NPR-A. Denali Commission Alaska Division of Community and Regional Affairs Municipalities must be in Alaska, within the National Petroleum Reserve, and demonstrate present or foreseeable future impact from oil or gas exploration, production, or transportation activities in the NPR-A. Not announced $9,100,000 N/A 15 $606,667 November 15, 2022 (recurring annually on this date) This is broad funding for a range of capital and operational needs. Past recipients have received funding for energy efficiency improvements, building upgrades and retrofits, fleet improvements, job training programs, and renovations of municipal and community facilities. For new construction or renovations, consider all-electric construction, high efficiency systems, and including on-site clean energy systems to support facility operations and reduce long-term fuel costs and resource consumption. As required by Alaska Statute, priority is given to those communities experiencing or will experience the most direct or severe impact from oil and gas development. Expected number of allocations based upon FY2021 projects recommended for funding. Prior years have funded between 3 and 30 projects. For information on prior awardees, see here: https://www.commerce.alaska.gov/web/Portals/4/pub/NPR-A%20Grant/2021%20National%20Petroleum%20Reserve%20-%20Alaska%20(NPR-A)%20Report.pdf No https://www.commerce.alaska.gov/web/dcra/GrantsSection/NPR-AlaskaImpactMitigationGrant.aspx
New - IIJA Regional Clean Hydrogen Hubs (H2Hubs) To develop at least 4 regional clean hydrogen hubs that: 1) Demonstrably aid the achievement of the clean hydrogen production standard developed; 2) Demonstrate the production, processing, delivery, storage and end-use of clean hydrogen, and; 3) Can be developed into a national clean hydrogen network to facilitate a clean hydrogen economy. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Clean Energy Demonstrations (OCED) Hydrogen hubs would need to demonstrate all components including the production, processing, delivery, storage, and end-use of clean hydrogen. Clean hydrogen is defined as hydrogen produced with a carbon intensity equal to or less than 2 kilograms of carbon dioxide (CO2)-equivalent produced at the site of production per kilogram of hydrogen produced. 50% match required $8,000,000,000 $1,250,000,000 4 $1,000,000,000 Expected in September/October 2022 Consider working with universities, research institutes, and private sectors to develop regional clean hydrogen hubs to demonstrate hydrogen production from renewable energy and other low-carbon energy sources. Check DOE Hydrogen Shot Request for Information (RFI) results to learn more about diverse resources, end-uses, and impact potential in various regions. If in a region with abundant natural gas resources, consider how hydrogen production can bring cleaner energy in a more efficient way and other long-term benefits. Priority may be given to hydrogen hubs that are likely to create opportunities for skills training and long-term employment for the greatest number of residents of the region. Consider how these new jobs can bring positive impacts to disadvantaged communities. Some potential factors include the number/percentage of workers hired from disadvantaged groups, the income level change of the region, etc. According to the IIJA Act, at least 1 regional clean hydrogen hub needs to demonstrate hydrogen production from fossil fuels, at least 1 from renewable energy, and at least 1 from nuclear energy. Besides, at least 1 regional hub shall demonstrate the end-use of clean hydrogen in the electric power generation sector, 1 in the industrial sector, 1 in the residential and commercial heating sector, and 1 in the transportation sector. It is also required that at least 2 hydrogen hubs be located in the regions of the United States with the greatest natural gas resources. The notice of intent (NOT) to issue a FOA can be found here: https://oced-exchange.energy.gov/Default.aspx?Search=hydrogen%20hubs&SearchType= More information can be found here: https://www.energy.gov/sites/default/files/2021-12/h2iq-12082021.pdf No https://www.energy.gov/bil/regional-clean-hydrogen-hubs
Existing - Constant Regional Forest Economy Partnership (RFEP) Program To assist rural communities, institutes of higher education and research, and economic development organizations in their efforts to transition the forest-based industry and its workforce to a focus on new technologies and viable business models across the 4-state region of Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont. Northern Border Regional Commission N/A Applicants must be in an eligible county across the 4-state region: Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont. 20-50% match required, depending on county economic status (0% local match accepted in FY21 if constrained by COVID-19) $4,000,000 $1,000,000 5 $800,000 Expected 3rd quarter 2022 Program focuses on forest industry and associated workforce development. This includes new technology and innovations that seek to find new uses for forest products and evolve traditional forest economy business models into those that can create sustainable future commercial markets and opportunities. Decarbonization options may include, where appropriate, carbon sequestration and offset projects, use of biomass/wood products for energy and heat, and improvements to energy efficiency and resilience of forest industrial operations, downstream businesses, and related operations. The Commission is required to annually assess the level of socioeconomic distress among the counties in its service area. Counties are designated as either Distressed, Transitional, or Attainment. “Distressed” counties are those that “have high rates of poverty, unemployment, or outmigration” and “are the most severely and persistently economic distressed and underdeveloped.” The NBRC is required to allocate 50% of total Appropriations to projects in counties falling within this designation. Commission grants within Distressed Counties only require a 20% match. Unlike other NBRC programs, this program emphasizes the regional significance of a project and its context within the broader regional economy. Applicants should state whether (and if so, how) the project is complementary to a comprehensive regional plan, and/or statewide economic development priorities. Past projects also include conversion of former mill sites into industrial parks and business incubators, construction of workforce housing, adaptive reuses of historic properties, and upgraded facilities to support forestry businesses. For more information on prior awardees, see here: https://www.nbrc.gov/userfiles/files/2021_RFEP_Documents/Regional%20Forest%20Economy%20Partnership%20Awards.pdf No https://www.nbrc.gov/content/RFEP_2021
New Smart Energy and Water Efficiency Pilot Program (Energy Act) To award grants to eligible entities to demonstrate unique, advanced, or innovative technology-based solutions that will improve the net energy balance of water, wastewater, and water reuse systems and improve energy-water conservation. Department of Energy (DOE) N/A Eligible entities include utilities, municipalities, water districts, Indian Tribes or Alaska Native villages, or any authority that provides water, wastewater, or water reuse services. Not required $15,000,000 N/A 3 to 5 $5,000,000 to $3,000,000 New program, deadline unknown. Consider projects which reduce the energy demand of water and wastewater systems, including through increased efficiency or fuel-switching from fossil-fuel-based sources to carbon-free sources. Consider prioritizing projects that will help improve local air pollution associated with critical water infrastructure. This includes wastewater treatment plants and other energy-intensive water infrastructure. Selection criteria will be based on 1) energy and cost savings, 2) the uniqueness, commercial viability, and reliability of the technology, 3) the degree to which the project integrates next-generation sensors software, analytics, and management tools, 4) anticipated cost-effectiveness of savings, 5) replicability, 6) whether the project will be completed in 5 years or less; and other factors. At this point, no application deadline is provided, but the Secretary must make selections within one year. No https://rules.house.gov/sites/democrats.rules.house.gov/files/BILLS-116HR133SA-RCP-116-68.pdf
Existing - Constant Solar Energy Innovation Network (SEIN) To assemble multi-stakeholder teams that research and share solutions to real-world challenges associated with solar energy adoption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) administers the program and, with other expert partners, provides technical assistance and facilitation support to identify local and regional impacts of team projects, formulate and test innovations, and validate new ideas. The third round of SEIN will focus on efforts to overcome barriers to equitable adoption of solar in underserved communities Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy and Technologies Office Not listed. Not required $5,500,000 $200,000 Unknown $200,000 June 15, 2021 Consider implementing projects that accelerate innovative distributed energy resources, such as rooftop solar, energy storage, and demand-side management. Consider prioritizing no-money down, immediate cost savings solutions to overcome financial barriers and partnering with frontline community-based organizations to overcome clean energy educational barriers facing underserved communities. N/A Over the course of 15 to 18 months, teams receive direct funding, analytical support from NREL and other expert partners, and facilitation support. Through coordinated engagement at four multi-day working sessions, teams work together to identify local and regional impacts, formulate and test innovations, and validate new models. No https://www.nrel.gov/solar/solar-energy-innovation-network.html
Existing - Constant State Economic & Infrastructure Development (SEID) Investment Program To fund economic development and infrastructure projects throughout designated counties in its 4-state service area of Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont. Revolving loan funds may be used to fund workforce development and job training. Northern Border Regional Commission N/A Applicants must be in an eligible county across the 4-state region: Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont. 20-50% match required, depending on county economic status $23,200,000 $1,000,000 (infrastructure projects); $350,000 (all other projects) 44 $527,273 Mandatory LOI: April 22, 2022 Full application: June 3, 2022 The program specifically highlights basic infrastructure construction and repair (efficiency retrofits, weatherization, sustainable building design, etc.), renewable energy infrastructure, and transportation infrastructure, including roads, bus stations, terminals, and refueling/charging stations. For workforce development projects, consider integrating new clean energy and EV supply chain manufacturing into regional economic development strategies. Where possible, consider whether partnerships with universities or community colleges could be leveraged to launch an economic diversification and workforce development strategy to promote and enhance the growth of emerging industries and retain local talent. The Commission is required to annually assess the level of economic and demographic distress among the counties in its service area. Counties are designated as either Distressed, Transitional, or Attainment. “Distressed” counties are those that “have high rates of poverty, unemployment, or outmigration” and “are the most severely and persistently economic distressed and underdeveloped.” The NBRC is required to allocate 50% of it total Appropriations to projects in counties falling within this designation. Commission grants within Distressed Counties only require a 20% match. To increase competitiveness, align projects with state economic development plans and NBRC’s Five Year Strategic Plan, linked here: https://www.nbrc.gov/content/strategic-plan NBRC investment funds originate from the Federal Government but are approved by the Federal Government’s NBRC representative (Federal Co-Chair) and the Governors of the four states. The NBRC partnership is aided by recognized Local Development Districts (LDD) that assist with technical assistance, provide information on complimentary funding opportunities for projects, and ensure consistency with administration of projects that are funded. No https://www.nbrc.gov/content/economic-infrastructure-development-investments
Existing - Increase States’ Economic Development Assistance Program (SEDAP) To support and improve regional economic development opportunities by supporting basic public infrastructure, transportation infrastructure, workforce development and business development with an emphasis on entrepreneurship. Delta Regional Authority N/A Applicants must be in one of the 252 counties and parishes across 8 states served by the Delta Regional Authority. To see the region map, click here: https://dra.gov/about-dra/map-room/ 10% match required for Business Development or Workforce Development funding $18,930,599 Varies by state N/A N/A June 5, 2022 (LDD); June 19, 2022 (DRA) Consider focusing on fundamental improvements to the efficiency and electrification of existing buildings, including weatherization of support facilities like community centers, schools, or housing. Upgrading community facilities with solar plus battery storage can convert such facilities into community resiliency hubs that serve as emergency power centers and cooling centers. To encourage entrepreneurship, explore integrating new clean energy and EV supply chain manufacturing hubs/business parks into regional economic development plans. Where possible, consider whether partnerships with universities or community colleges could be leveraged to launch an economic diversification and workforce development strategy to promote and enhance the growth of emerging clean energy industries and retain local talent. DRA evaluates distressed populations and county areas when allocating funding to each state. It is possible for infrastructure projects in distressed counties/parishes to receive 100% project funding. Under federal law, at least 75% of DRA funds must be invested in economically distressed counties and parishes. All SEDAP projects should support one or more strategic DRA goals: 1) improved workforce competitiveness; 2) strengthened infrastructure; and/or 3) increased community capacity. Competitiveness of applications will also be increased if any local match or leverage is able to be provided, even if not required. For more information on the program, see here: https://dra.gov/images/uploads/content_files/StatesEconomicDevelopmentAssistanceProgram2021(SEDAP).pdf No https://dra.gov/funding-programs-states-economic-development/states-economic-development-assistance-program/
New - IIJA Wastewater Efficiency Grant Pilot Program To assist 15 publicly owned treatment works (POTW) to create or improve waste-to energy systems. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) TBA Eligible applicants include owners or operators of POTW. Grant awards can include sludge collection systems, anaerobic digesters, methane capture or transfer, and other emerging technologies that transform waste to energy. TBA $20,000,000 $4,000,000 N/A N/A TBA Consider deployment of methane capture and transfer technology to increase renewable energy supply. Improve the efficiency of waste-to-energy systems to reduce carbon emissions from waste treatment. Local communities should be engaged with the deployment of waste-to-energy systems and be informed of potential impacts. Consider how the new system can benefit local communities, especially those disadvantaged groups. Potential positive impacts include air quality improvement, clean energy supply increase, new job opportunities, etc. N/A $100,000,000 are available for FY2022 through FY2026. No
Existing - Increase WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grants To support projects that conserve and use water more efficiently; increase the production of hydropower; mitigate conflict risk in areas at a high risk of future water conflict; and accomplish other benefits that contribute to water supply reliability in the western United States. Department of Interior (DOI) Bureau of Reclamation An eligible applicant is a state, Indian tribe, irrigation district, water district, or other organization with water or power delivery authority. Applicants must also be located in the Western US or Territories, specifically: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the Virgin Islands. 50% required $42,000,000 $5,000,000 35 $1,200,000 July 28, 2022 This program specifically funds projects that increase the reliability of water supply and/or the use of hydropower in managing and delivering water. Note that other types of renewable energy projects, including large-scale solar, wind, and geothermal projects, are ineligible through this program. See the "Equity Design Considerations for Federal Funding" for general considerations and additional sector-based resources: https://cityrenewables.org/resources/equity-design-considerations-for-federal-funding/ Applicants proposing hydropower development may wish to contact the Program Coordinator listed in Section G, Agency Contacts, prior to the application deadline to discuss the requirements listed above. This program was formerly known as USBR's Challenge Grants program. No https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=339953
  • To provide grant funding for a range of eligible purposes, including developing inventories of brownfield sites, prioritizing sites, engaging community stakeholders, conducting assessments, developing cleanup and reuse plans for key sites, conducting cleanup activities, and developing a revitalization plan.
  • To invest in and undertake hazard mitigation projects, reducing the risks communities face from disasters and natural hazards.
  • To demonstrate the technical and economic viability of clean energy projects on current and former mines.
  • To support a technology-neutral approach to planning and implementation of greenhouse gas pollution reduction strategies.
  • To expand DOE’s network of grid-interactive efficient building communities nationwide and demonstrate the ability of groups of buildings and distributed energy resources (DERs) to provide cost effective grid services through demand flexibility and efficiency that maximize use of renewable resources and reduce emissions, while maintaining (if not enhancing) occupant satisfaction and productivity.
  • To invest in innovative research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects that accelerate the large-scale development and deployment of renewable energy to support an equitable transition to a decarbonized electricity system by 2035 and net-zero emissions economy by 2050.
  • To invest in community-led projects in disadvantaged communities and community capacity-building centers to address disproportionate environmental and public health harms related to pollution and climate change.
  • To give up to 10 States additional flexibility to determine the Federal share on a project, multiple-project, or program basis for projects under any of the following funded under the National Highway Performance Program, the Surface Transportation Block Grant Program, the Highway Safety Improvement Program, the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program National Highway Freight Program, the Carbon Reduction Program, and the PROTECT grant program.
  • To make energy efficiency, renewable energy, and alternative fueled vehicle upgrades and improvements at public schools.
  • To help communities develop and implement plans that reduce stormwater runoff, increase the number and size of green spaces in urban areas, improve the health of local streams and the Chesapeake Bay, and enhance quality of life and community livability.
  • To assist communities in accelerating the deployment of low-carbon technologies and reducing or avoiding greenhouse gas emissions and other forms of air pollution.
  • To promote the development of integrated micro-grid systems for isolated communities and micro-grid systems to increase the resilience of critical infrastructure. Focus on micro-grid systems owned or operated by isolated communities, rural electric co-operatives, and municipal governments.
  • To address important environmental priorities under existing statutes, such as advancing environmental justice and tackling climate change, including development and enforcement of regulations requiring that sources of contamination clean up and remediate affected areas; pre-cleanup and pre-remediation activities such as site assessment and sampling; and public outreach for site-specific work.
  • To help mitigate adverse impacts related to oil and gas development within the NPR-A.
  • To develop at least 4 regional clean hydrogen hubs that: 1) Demonstrably aid the achievement of the clean hydrogen production standard developed; 2) Demonstrate the production, processing, delivery, storage and end-use of clean hydrogen, and; 3) Can be developed into a national clean hydrogen network to facilitate a clean hydrogen economy.
  • To assist rural communities, institutes of higher education and research, and economic development organizations in their efforts to transition the forest-based industry and its workforce to a focus on new technologies and viable business models across the 4-state region of Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont.
  • To award grants to eligible entities to demonstrate unique, advanced, or innovative technology-based solutions that will improve the net energy balance of water, wastewater, and water reuse systems and improve energy-water conservation.
  • To assemble multi-stakeholder teams that research and share solutions to real-world challenges associated with solar energy adoption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) administers the program and, with other expert partners, provides technical assistance and facilitation support to identify local and regional impacts of team projects, formulate and test innovations, and validate new ideas. The third round of SEIN will focus on efforts to overcome barriers to equitable adoption of solar in underserved communities
  • To fund economic development and infrastructure projects throughout designated counties in its 4-state service area of Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont. Revolving loan funds may be used to fund workforce development and job training.
  • To support and improve regional economic development opportunities by supporting basic public infrastructure, transportation infrastructure, workforce development and business development with an emphasis on entrepreneurship.
  • To assist 15 publicly owned treatment works (POTW) to create or improve waste-to energy systems.
  • To support projects that conserve and use water more efficiently; increase the production of hydropower; mitigate conflict risk in areas at a high risk of future water conflict; and accomplish other benefits that contribute to water supply reliability in the western United States.
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