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Funding Guidance

America’s Federal Funding Opportunities and Resources for Decarbonization

This tool is primarily intended to streamline state, local, non-profit, and community efforts to increase understanding of eligible funding, tax credits, and other incentives relevant to your project, goals, and community. The tool focuses on decarbonization efforts, including electricity, transportation, buildings, and resilient energy systems. It does not exhaustively capture federal resources for other topics. Use the filters below to sort available funding sources automatically and focus on the funding sources relevant to your project, goals, and community. Then use the compare feature to select up to 4 programs most relevant to review side-by-side.

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Updates

The AFFORD tool will be updated on a monthly basis until otherwise noted. This version of AFFORD was last updated in January 2024.

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For more information on the AFFORD tool, check out our Funding Guidance. Contact Matthew Popkin (mpopkin@rmi.org) or Alex Dane (alex.dane@wri.org) with any questions or feedback.

Displaying 12 out of 255 Funding Opportunities
New or Existing Program Name Purpose Agency Sub-Department Eligibility Requirements Matching Funding Available Max Award Expected Allocations Average Award Deadline Decarbonization Considerations Equity Considerations Helpful Tips Other Notes Only for Federal Emergency Declaration? Webpage
New - IRA 179D: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Deduction
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To provide a tax deduction to some building owners and tenants who place in service energy efficient commercial building property (EECBP) or energy efficient commercial building retrofit property (EEBRP). Department of Treasury Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Beginning January 1, 2023, the deduction is available to: - Owners of qualified commercial buildings - Designers of EECBP/EEBRP installed in buildings owned by specified tax-exempt entities, including certain government entities, Indian tribal governments, Alaska Native Corporations, and other tax-exempt organizations N/A The deduction is the lesser of: 1) The cost of the installed property; 2) The savings per square foot calculated as: $0.50 per square foot for a building with 25% energy savings, plus $0.02 per square foot for each percentage point of energy savings above 25%, up to a maximum of $1.00 per square foot for a building with 50% energy savings. The deduction is 5 times the base amount if the project meets prevailing wage and apprenticeship requirements. $5/sq. ft. Uncapped N/A N/A Under the Inflation Reduction Act, energy savings must be measured against the latest ASHRAE standard affirmed by the Secretary of Treasury at least 4 years before the property is placed in service. EECBP and EEBRP must be installed on or in a qualified building as part of the interior lighting systems; the heating, cooling, ventilation, and hot water systems; or the building envelope. Beginning in 2023, if local prevailing wages are paid and apprenticeship requirements are met, an increased maximum deduction applies. The maximum amount increases to 5 times the savings per square foot amount. Governmental and other tax exempt entities should consult with contracted design teams or prospective teams to indicate their interest in leveraging energy efficient designs for buildings they own and maintain. One way to indicate preference or requirement is through requests for qualifications (RFQs) or requests for proposals (RFPs) issued by the entity seeking bids that would intend to leverage this deduction. Under the Inflation Reduction Act, energy savings must be measured against the latest ASHRAE standard affirmed by the Secretary of Treasury at least 4 years before the property is placed in service. For buildings that begin construction on or after January 1, 2023, and have energy efficient property placed in service on or after January 1, 2027, ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2019 applies. No https://www.irs.gov/credits-deductions/energy-efficient-commercial-buildings-deduction
New - IRA Assistance for Latest and Zero Building Energy Code Adoption
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To help adopting and implementating residential building codes that meet/exceed the 2021 International Energy Conservation Code, commercial building codes that meet/exceed ANSI/ASHRAE/IES standard 90.1-2019 ("Latest Building Energy Codes") and building codes that meet/exceed the zero energy provisions in the 2021 International Energy Conservation Code, or equivalent ("Zero Energy Codes"). Department of Energy (DOE) State and Community Energy Programs (SCEP) Eligible recipients include States and units of local government with the authority to adopt building codes. Not required $400,000,000 for states formula funding, $530 million for competitive funding N/A N/A Varies by state For states and territories: January 31, 2024 (Letter of Intent). For competitive funding: February 9, 2024 (Concept Paper); April 30, 2024 (Full Application) This program helps states and local governments improve their building energy codes to increase efficiency and enforce cutting-edge standards. Building affordable housing and decarbonizing buildings should work synergistically by leveraging codes, energy efficiency, and funding strategies. Updating building energy codes can enhance energy efficiency, reduce energy burdens, address split incentive situations between tenants and landlords, and make everyday living expenses more affordable for all. Learn more here: https://newbuildings.org/energy-efficiency-and-equity/ N/A $1,000,000,000 is available through FY29 ($330,000,000 for Latest Building Energy Codes; $670,000,000 for Zero Energy Codes) No https://www.energy.gov/scep/technical-assistance-adoption-building-energy-codes
Existing - IIJA Increase Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)
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To provide seed money to capitalize a revolving loan fund program including loans and subgrants to clean up and remediate sites across a region or community. Revolving loan funds are used to provide no-interest or low-interest loans for eligible brownfield cleanups, subgrants for cleanups, and other eligible programmatic costs necessary to manage the loan fund. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization (OBLR) Recipients must have a strong understanding of real estate financing principles and approaches, including loan underwriting, loan servicing, and credit analysis. Recipients also need to have the ability to market the program on an on-going basis during the performance period of the grant and after the closeout of the RLF Grant. Recipients commit to properly manage funds and program income generated by their program until its official close. Only entities without open RLF cooperative agreements are eligible to apply. Not required $10,000,000 $1,000,000 10 $1,000,000 Supplemental grant request due March 15, 2024 These funds are meant to be transformative in efficiently cleaning up multiple sites for reuse. Consider pursuing with intent to reuse and convert of multiple brownfields into brightfields with one bulk procurement, either on a single or multijurisdictional basis. This is an opportunity for communities to take ownership of seed funding to accelerate the long-term revitalization of multiple brownfields. Consider creating regional partnerships to leverage financial, marketing, and program administration experience in order to build capacity for localized loans and subgrants. Using this funding to create new hubs for clean energy manufacturing and jobs and offer opportunities to improve distributional equity where communities were previously neglected. These are highly competitive projects geared at communities with extensive brownfield sites. If structured correctly, these revolving loan fund programs can generate program income from repayment of loans to sustain programs from a few years to decades. If selected, the lead entity will be the grant recipient and must administer the grant, be accountable to EPA for proper expenditure of the funds and be the point of contact for the other coalition members. In addition, a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) documenting the coalition’s site selection process must be in place prior to the expenditure of any funds that are awarded. The coalition members should identify and establish relationships necessary to achieve the project’s goal. A process for successful execution of the project’s goal, including a description and role of each coalition member, should be established along with the MOA. The purpose of the MOA is for coalition members to agree internally on the distribution of funds and the mechanisms for implementing the cleanup work. $60 million in supplemental funding is available for entities that have an open Brownfield Revolving Loan Fund grant. See here for application details: https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/fy-2024-availability-supplemental-funds-eligible-brownfields-revolving-loan-fund-grants No https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/brownfields-revolving-loan-fund-rlf-grants
New - IRA Green and Resilient Retrofit Program Comprehensive (GRRPC)
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To provide funding to properties with the highest need for climate resilience and utility efficiency upgrades, regardless of prior development or environmental retrofit experience. Awardees will have access to support in commissioning property assessments to plan a redevelopment that meets the property’s specific needs as well as GRRP retrofit objectives. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) Office of Housing, Office of Multifamily Housing Programs, Office of Recapitalization Eligible recipients generally include owners or sponsors of federally assisted housing properties. 50% cost-share required for Cost-Share Items, 75% cost-share required for High Impact GRRP-Paid Items $1,470,000,000 $20,000,000 per property or $80,000 per unit 300 $4,900,000 There are four application review periods, with application deadline of August 31, 2023, November 30, 2023, February 28, 2024, and May 30, 2024 This program focuses on innovative energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions reductions, green and healthy housing measures, renewable energy generation, use of building materials with lower embodied carbon, and climate resilience investments. This program can be used to increase the resilience and efficiency of affordable housing properties, reducing bills and risk for low-income residents. Applicants are required to submit a narrative demonstrating how the proposed projects will benefit persons or communities or color and how it will advance racial equity. N/A N/A https://www.hud.gov/GRRP/comprehensive
New - IRA Green and Resilient Retrofit Program Elements (GRRPE)
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To support proven and meaningful climate resilience and utility efficiency measures in projects that are already in the process of a recapitalization transaction. Examples of eligible Elements investments include, but are not limited to, installation of electric HVAC heat pumps, Energy Star windows, fire resistant roofs and clean energy generation systems. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) Office of Housing, Office of Multifamily Housing Programs, Office of Recapitalization Eligible recipients generally include owners or sponsors of federally assisted housing properties. Not required $140,000,000 $750,000 per property or $40,000 per unit 200 $700,000 There are four application review periods, with application deadline of June 29, 2023, September 28, 2023, January 4, 2024, and March 28, 2024 This program is a flexible resource for decarbonizing affordable housing properties to improve health, safety, and efficiency of structures. Eligible investments include energy and water efficiency improvement, renewable energy installation, activities that can reduce resident exposure to health risks and environmental hazards, etc. This program can be used to increase the resilience and efficiency of affordable housing properties, reducing bills and risk for low-income residents. Applicants are required to submit a narrative demonstrating how the proposed projects will benefit persons or communities or color and how it will advance racial equity. N/A N/A https://www.hud.gov/GRRP/elements
New - IRA Green and Resilient Retrofit Program Leading Edge (GRRPL)
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To provide funding for ambitious retrofit activities to achieve an advanced green certification. Leading Edge awards complement the existing financing strategy, allowing projects to reach the highest standards of utility efficiency and climate resilience and be recognized under programs like LEED and PHIUS. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) Office of Housing, Office of Multifamily Housing Programs, Office of Recapitalization Eligible recipients generally include owners or sponsors of federally assisted housing properties. Not required $400,000,000 $10,000,000 per property or $60,000 per unit 100 $4,000,000 There are four application review periods, with application deadline of July 31, 2023, October 31, 2023, January 31, 2024, and Apri 30, 2024 The owner must be pursuing net zero green certifications with respect to the property. Such certifications include 1) National Green Building Standard Green: Gold or Emerald, with Green+ Net Zero Energy or Resilience designation, 2) Passive House (PHIUS+) ZERO or ZERO REVIVE, 3) Passive House Institute EnerPHit, 4) LEED v4 Gold or Platinum, with LEED Zero Carbon or LEED Zero Energy designation, 5) LEED v4.1 Multifamily or Multifamily Core+Shell Silver or higher, with Zero Energy or Zero Carbon designation, 6) Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Multifamily, with renewable energy capacity sufficient to offset expected annual energy consumption, etc. This program can be used to increase the resilience and efficiency of affordable housing properties, reducing bills and risk for low-income residents. Applicants are required to submit a narrative demonstrating how the proposed projects will benefit persons or communities or color and how it will advance racial equity. N/A N/A https://www.hud.gov/GRRP/leadingedge
New - IRA Home Efficiency Rebate Program (State Energy Program)
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To help State Energy Offices develop and implement HOMES programs rebating homeowners and aggregators undertaking whole-house, energy-saving retrofits. States may use up to 20% of funds for administrative purposes. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of State and Community Energy Programs (SCEP) States must create a plan for providing rebates to consumers for increasing their energy savings by more than 20%. States must include a plan for community engagement, home assessments, funding for low-income households, data collection and evaluation and delivering rebates to eligible applicants. Not required $4,300,000,000 through FY31 $8,000 per rebate recipient N/A N/A January 31, 2025 This program provides a unique opportunity to pay for whole-house efficiency retrofits. 20-35% building-wide savings triggers a rebate up to $2,000/unit or 50% of project costs, whichever is less (increased to $4,000 and 80%, respectively, for LMI households). 35%+ building-wide savings triggers a rebate up to $4,000 or 50% of project costs, whichever is less (increased to $8,000 and 80%, respectively, for LMI households). This program can be used to increase the efficiency of low-income households, reducing bills, and providing weatherization that can improve the health and comfort of eligible residents. States may increase the maximum rebate amount available to low-income households, upon approval from DOE. Local governments should work with State Energy Offices to ensure rebate funds are seamlessly disbursed and able to be blended with existing non-federal incentive programs. This program cannot be combined with other federal rebate programs but it can be combined with 25C, the home efficiency tax credit. No https://www.energy.gov/scep/home-energy-rebate-program
New - IRA Home Electrification and Appliance Rebate Program (State Energy Program)
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To help State Energy Offices develop and implement programs in which eligible, income-qualified electrification projects will be rebated at the point of sale. States may use up to 20% of funds for administrative purposes. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of State and Community Energy Programs (SCEP) Eligible purchases include heat pumps, heat pump water heaters, heat pump dryers, electric stoves/ranges/ovens, electric load service center upgrades, insulation, air sealing, ventilation, and electric wiring. This program covers 100% of project costs (up to $14,000) for low-income households and 50% (up to $14,000) for moderate-income households. Not required $4,275,000,000 through FY31 $14,000 per rebate recipient N/A N/A January 31, 2025 This program funds a variety of rebates on electric appliances and efficient building materials that can be combined with existing programs to increase the market for efficient electric technologies. Eligible appliances include heat pump water heaters, heat pump for heating and cooling, electric stoves, cooktops, range oven, heat pump clothes dryer. Eligible building materials include electric load service center, insulation, air sealing, ventilation, and electric wiring. This program can be used to increase the efficiency of low-income households, reducing bills, and providing weatherization that can improve the health and comfort of eligible residents. This program is income-qualified, such that those making 80-150% of AMI are rebated up to 50% of project costs and those making less than 80% of AMI are rebated up to 100%. Local governments should work with State Energy Offices to ensure rebate funds are seamlessly disbursed and able to be blended with existing non-federal incentive programs. This program cannot be combined with other federal rebate programs but it can be combined with 25C, the home efficiency tax credit. No https://www.energy.gov/scep/home-energy-rebate-programs
Existing - Increase Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) (American Rescue Plan Act)
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To provide assistance to low-income households for home energy heating and cooling costs. These entities set program guidelines and work with local providers to implement services. These program guidelines include income limits and what services may qualify (e.g., direct bill assistance with heating and cooling, weatherization, furnace or AC replacement). Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Community Services (OCS) Eligible projects include income limits that are set federally (must target households with incomes no greater than 150% of the federal poverty guidelines of 60% of the state median income), beyond this state grantees set program guidelines. These program guidelines include income limits and what services may qualify (e.g., direct bill assistance with heating and cooling, weatherization, furnace or AC replacement). There is also a carve-out for Tribal communities. Not required $3,700,000,000 N/A N/A N/A Funding has been allocated to eligible entities for FY23 The primary purpose of LIHEAP is to assist to low-income households in covering home heating and cooling costs. LIHEAP programs are determined by the state, but generally cover direct bill assistance for home heating and cooling costs and certain low-cost energy efficiency measures. Within this program intent, decarbonization strategies may include measures that reduce household energy consumption, including additional energy efficiency improvements, water heater or furnace replacements, or educational materials that may be developed and distributed to LIHEAP recipients. According to federal LIHEAP guidelines, state grantees must target benefits to households with low incomes. They must cap LIHEAP income-eligibility at (1) no more than the greater of 150% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines (FPG) or 60 percent of the State Median Income; and (2) no less than 110 percent of FPG. They must also give higher benefits to households with the greatest home energy need in relation to household income and number of household members. Grantees also must target benefits to households with members who are elderly, disabled, and/or a young child. The target population of LIHEAP are households who struggle to cover home energy and cooling costs and those with large energy burdens. Beyond these guidelines, state grantees may choose to incorporate other equity metrics. Where appropriate, policymakers may consider the indoor and outdoor air quality improvements that may be associated with reduced energy usage, as well as historic levels of investment in different areas. These may be determined by fuel type, building age, renter/owner status that may contribute to the energy efficiency gap, and other factors. See program timeline here: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ocs/policy-guidance/liheap-grantee-deadlines A 2020 HHS Report to Congress on LIHEAP may be viewed here: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/documents/ocs/rpt_liheap_congressional_request_for_formula_analysis_fy2020_final.pdf A 2019 Congressional Research Service report on the LIHEAP formula may be viewed here: https://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL33275.pdf No https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ocs/low-income-home-energy-assistance-program-liheap
New - IRA State-Based Home Energy Efficiency Contractor Training Grants (State Energy Program)
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To help State Energy Offices to train, test, and certify residential energy efficiency and electrification contractors. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of State and Community Energy Programs (SCEP) Eligible recipients include States involved for training on installation of home energy efficiency and electrification improvements. Not required $200,000,000 through FY31 N/A N/A Varies by state January 31, 2024 This program is designed to increase the quantity and quality of contractors needed to install carbon-reducing technologies like heat pumps. Such contractors are currently in short supply, and qualified, informed contractors can help accelerate the transition to more efficient, electric, and renewable technologies - and a clean energy economy overall. State may use amounts received to: 1) Reduce the cost of training contractor employees; 2) Provide testing and certification of contractors trained and educated under a State program developed and implemented pursuant to subsection (a); and 3) Partner with nonprofit organizations to develop and implement a State program pursuant to subsection States administrative costs may not exceed 10%. This program may be used to create good, long-term jobs in clean energy. Program implementers may consider prioritizing job training programs for low-income and otherwise disadvantaged communities. N/A Funds include $150,000,000 formula grants, and up to $40,000,000 to be distributed to states through a competitive process. No https://www.energy.gov/scep/state-based-home-energy-efficiency-contractor-training-grants
Existing - Increase Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP)
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To reduce energy costs for low-income households by increasing the energy efficiency of the homes while ensuring the resident’s health and safety. It is the nation’s single largest residential whole-house energy efficiency program. The reauthorization provides funding through FY 2025 and expands to include renewable energy services and technologies as part of eligible technologies. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) WAP provides core program funding to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Native American Tribes, and the five U.S. territories—American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands—through formula grants. Once DOE awards the grants, the states, tribes, and territories contract with roughly 700 local organizations nationwide that consists of community action agencies, other nonprofits, and local governments. Not required $326,000,000 The adjusted average cost per dwelling unit (ACPU) is capped at $8,250 N/A N/A Expected mid-2023 This is a reauthorization of the WAP program that increases funding under the existing block grant program, expands the eligible technology list to include renewable energy technologies, and provides separate competitive grants for WAP program enhancement and innovation. Decarbonization strategies may include weatherization of units occupied by low-income households; installation of renewable energy at units occupied by low-income households; and workforce training for WAP contractors. Policymakers may consider this time to review their existing WAP programs from an equity lens. This includes in procedural processes and program design, distributional impacts and outreach to households and communities, and in contractor selection. Contractor optimization and expanded training and workforce development opportunities is a source of focus for program enhancement within the bill. This includes language prioritizing the hiring and retention of employees who are from the community in which the assistance is being provided, and from communities or groups that are underrepresented in the home energy performance workforce, including religious and ethnic minorities, women, veterans, individuals with disabilities, and individuals who are socioeconomically disadvantaged. N/A Of note, the FY23 appropriations for WAP include: $290M in formula grants, $20M for WAP Enhancement and Innovation (E&I), $6.5M for Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grants, $10M for Headquarters Training & Technical Assistance (T&TA) which includes a pilot program to develop and implement strategies to address harmful substances such as vermiculite, and $30M for Weatherization Readiness Fund to enhance the pipeline of low-income homes in need of structural repairs to be ready for traditional energy retrofit servicing. Program expires in 2025. No https://www.energy.gov/eere/wap/weatherization-assistance-program
Existing - Increase Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) - Enhancement & Innovation Program (E&I)
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To scale up residential weatherization efforts in DOE WAP-eligible buildings. Funding supports demonstration projects that have the potential to be scaled nationally, enhance the benefits realized by underserved communities, and ensure an equitable transition to a clean-energy economy. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Eligible applicants include WAP grantees, subgrantees, and other nonprofit entities.  Not required $25,000,000 $2,000,000  13-17 $1,666,667 August 31, 2023 (Concept Paper); January 5, 2024 (Full Application) Eligible activities include the installation of renewable energy systems and energy efficiency technologies, including home energy management systems and smart devices.  Applicants need to clearly describe how the project will benefit underserved communities and how the benefit will be measured. Collaboration with community-based organizations is highly recommended to enhance community partnerships.  For "workforce development" proposal, consider how to recruit, hire, train, retain and support employees in their career development who are individuals from the community in which assistance is provided and from underrepresented groups in the home energy performance and energy efficiency workforce such as: minorities, women, veterans, individuals with disabilities, opportunity youth, returning citizens, and individuals who are socioeconomically disadvantaged.  While no matching funds are required, more competitive proposals will leverage a range of federal or non-federal funding, financial contributions, volunteer labor, in-kind donations, and other resources provided by partner organizations. The extent to which such applicant will utilize partnerships with existing WAP Grantees, Subgrantees, and regional coordination is listed as one of the selection factors.  Municipal governments are welcome to coordinate with any of the prime applicants and develop an application in a sub-applicant role.  A maximum of 15% of the E&I award may be used for planning, management, and administration.  No https://eere-exchange.energy.gov/FileContent.aspx?FileID=7c2f798a-b4ef-49c5-9a21-b3ffec829aef
  • To provide a tax deduction to some building owners and tenants who place in service energy efficient commercial building property (EECBP) or energy efficient commercial building retrofit property (EEBRP).
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  • To help adopting and implementating residential building codes that meet/exceed the 2021 International Energy Conservation Code, commercial building codes that meet/exceed ANSI/ASHRAE/IES standard 90.1-2019 ("Latest Building Energy Codes") and building codes that meet/exceed the zero energy provisions in the 2021 International Energy Conservation Code, or equivalent ("Zero Energy Codes").
    Compare
  • To provide seed money to capitalize a revolving loan fund program including loans and subgrants to clean up and remediate sites across a region or community. Revolving loan funds are used to provide no-interest or low-interest loans for eligible brownfield cleanups, subgrants for cleanups, and other eligible programmatic costs necessary to manage the loan fund.
    Compare
  • To provide funding to properties with the highest need for climate resilience and utility efficiency upgrades, regardless of prior development or environmental retrofit experience. Awardees will have access to support in commissioning property assessments to plan a redevelopment that meets the property’s specific needs as well as GRRP retrofit objectives.
    Compare
  • To support proven and meaningful climate resilience and utility efficiency measures in projects that are already in the process of a recapitalization transaction. Examples of eligible Elements investments include, but are not limited to, installation of electric HVAC heat pumps, Energy Star windows, fire resistant roofs and clean energy generation systems.
    Compare
  • To provide funding for ambitious retrofit activities to achieve an advanced green certification. Leading Edge awards complement the existing financing strategy, allowing projects to reach the highest standards of utility efficiency and climate resilience and be recognized under programs like LEED and PHIUS.
    Compare
  • To help State Energy Offices develop and implement HOMES programs rebating homeowners and aggregators undertaking whole-house, energy-saving retrofits. States may use up to 20% of funds for administrative purposes.
    Compare
  • To help State Energy Offices develop and implement programs in which eligible, income-qualified electrification projects will be rebated at the point of sale. States may use up to 20% of funds for administrative purposes.
    Compare
  • To provide assistance to low-income households for home energy heating and cooling costs. These entities set program guidelines and work with local providers to implement services. These program guidelines include income limits and what services may qualify (e.g., direct bill assistance with heating and cooling, weatherization, furnace or AC replacement).
    Compare
  • To help State Energy Offices to train, test, and certify residential energy efficiency and electrification contractors.
    Compare
  • To reduce energy costs for low-income households by increasing the energy efficiency of the homes while ensuring the resident’s health and safety. It is the nation’s single largest residential whole-house energy efficiency program. The reauthorization provides funding through FY 2025 and expands to include renewable energy services and technologies as part of eligible technologies.
    Compare
  • To scale up residential weatherization efforts in DOE WAP-eligible buildings. Funding supports demonstration projects that have the potential to be scaled nationally, enhance the benefits realized by underserved communities, and ensure an equitable transition to a clean-energy economy.
    Compare
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