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Funding Guidance

America’s Federal Funding Opportunities and Resources for Decarbonization

This tool is primarily intended to streamline state, local, non-profit, and community efforts to increase understanding of eligible funding, tax credits, and other incentives relevant to your project, goals, and community. The tool focuses on decarbonization efforts, including electricity, transportation, buildings, and resilient energy systems. It does not exhaustively capture federal resources for other topics. Use the filters below to sort available funding sources automatically and focus on the funding sources relevant to your project, goals, and community. Then use the compare feature to select up to 4 programs most relevant to review side-by-side.

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Updates

The AFFORD tool will be updated on a monthly basis until otherwise noted. This version of AFFORD was last updated in January 2024.

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For more information on the AFFORD tool, check out our Funding Guidance. Contact Matthew Popkin (mpopkin@rmi.org) or Alex Dane (alex.dane@wri.org) with any questions or feedback.

Displaying 13 out of 255 Funding Opportunities
New or Existing Program Name Purpose Agency Sub-Department Eligibility Requirements Matching Funding Available Max Award Expected Allocations Average Award Deadline Decarbonization Considerations Equity Considerations Helpful Tips Other Notes Only for Federal Emergency Declaration? Webpage
Existing - Increase Abandoned Mine Land Economic Revitalization (AMLER) Program
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To explore and implement strategies that return legacy coal mining sites to productive uses through economic and community development. The AMLER Program supports local investment opportunities that provide for sustainable long-term rehabilitation of coalfield economies. Department of the Interior Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement States and federally recognized Indian Tribes with approved reclamation plans under section 405 of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) to accelerate the remediation of abandoned mine land (AML) sites with economic and community development end uses. Not required $135,000,000 $29,347,000 Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia are each allocated $29.347 million; Alabama, Ohio, and Virginia are each allocated $11.739 million; while the Navajo Nation, Hopi Tribe, and Crow Tribe are each allocated $3.913 million. n/a Funding is allocated by Congress in the annual appropriations law Reclamation projects must also include an economic and community development nexus. This can be demonstrated either in a project that incorporates economic and community development in the project itself or in a reclamation project that creates conditions for future economic and community development that occurs post-reclamation. Economic development can be measured in jobs created, businesses created or served, communities served, and more. State and Tribal programs encourage applicants to leverage other public and private resources or to provide in-kind contributions, to demonstrate project viability and broader stakeholder buy-in. For example: AMLER $ + Private $; AMLER $ + AML $; AMLER $ + Bipartisan Infrastructure Law AML $; AMLER $ + ARC $; AMLER $ + EDA $; AMLER $ + USDA $ No https://www.osmre.gov/programs/reclaiming-abandoned-mine-lands/amler
Existing - IIJA Increase Brownfields Assessment Grants
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To evaluate potentially contaminated sites that may need cleanup from prior use. The program offers community-wide assessments for multiple community sites, site-specific grants for an already identified single-site project focus, and assessment coalition grants to increase the capacity of multijurisdictional entities to assess sites in multiple communities. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization (OBLR) All applicants must meet the "threshold criteria" as outlined in the updated notice of funding opportunity. Not required $80,500,000 Varies by type of assessment grant 98 $821,429 November 13, 2023 Transforming underutilized or abandoned sites in your community into revitalized energy hubs can also spur economic revitalization. These funds can help determine which brownfields and closed landfill sites may be good fits for hosting solar or other renewable energy. The EPA offers explicit guidance for considering such "brightfields" projects: https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/are-you-considering-renewable-energy-or-energy-efficient-approaches-your-brownfields A critical part of the program is to ensure that residents living in communities historically affected by economic disinvestment, health disparities, and environmental contamination have an opportunity to reap the benefits from brownfields redevelopment. For example, large brownfield sites can be future hubs for new manufacturing and clean energy jobs and offer opportunities to improve distributional equity where communities were previously neglected. There are 3 different types of assessment grants. Review each type to determine which is most relevant to your community or project: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=343486 https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=343466 https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=343484 The IIJA authorized $1.5 billion in Additional funding over 5 years to scale up EPA's brownfields revitalization program. No https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/brownfields-assessment-grants
Existing - IIJA Increase Brownfields Cleanup Grants
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To clean up one brownfield site, or multiple brownfield sites, contaminated by hazardous substances, pollutants, contaminants (including hazardous substances co-mingled with petroleum), and/or petroleum. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization (OBLR) Applicants must own the site for which they are requesting funding and may submit one Cleanup Grant proposal each competition cycle. Not required $60,000,000 $2,000,000 40 $1,500,000 November 13, 2023 Cleanup grants can help accelerate reuse of brownfield sites, including enhancing site readiness for hosting solar or other renewable energy or other sustainable economic development. Cleaning up contaminated sites of any size often yields immediate environmental and human health, environmental justice benefit, and distributional equity benefits. National program priorities tend to change each year, so be sure to tailor your application to the current guidance. The IIJA authorized $1.5 billion in Additional funding over 5 years to scale up EPA's brownfields revitalization program. No https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/brownfields-cleanup-grants
Existing - IIJA Increase Brownfields Job Training (JT) Grants
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To deliver Brownfields Job Training programs that recruit, train, and place local, unemployed and under-employed residents with the skills needed to secure full-time employment in the environmental field. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization (OBLR) Eligible entities include states, local governments, land clearance authorities or other quasi-governmental entities, regional councils, redevelopment agencies, tribes, non-profits, etc. Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) training be provided to all individuals being trained. Not required $12,000,000 $500,000 24 $500,000 August 2, 2023 Job Training Grants allow nonprofits, local governments, and other organizations to recruit, train, and place unemployed and under-employed residents of areas affected by the presence of brownfields. Through the Program, graduates develop the skills needed to secure full-time, sustainable employment in various aspects of hazardous and solid waste management and within the larger environmental field, including sustainable cleanup and reuse, water quality improvement, chemical safety, and emergency response. These green jobs reduce environmental contamination and build more sustainable futures for communities. Each activity must meet one of the following national objectives for the program: benefit low- and moderate-income persons, prevention or elimination of slums or blight, or address community development needs having a particular urgency because existing conditions pose a serious and immediate threat to the health or welfare of the community for which other funding is not available. Employers, workforce investment boards (WIBs), community colleges, and community-based organizations provide critical partnerships needed to deliver a successful training program – especially since grant funds may not be used to provide life skills training or social services which can be leveraged through these partnerships. Applicants who hold a community meeting, notify the community about the proposed environmental training program prior to submission of an application, and work with and solicit feedback from diverse community constituents about the proposed program prior to submission typically have stronger applications. Entities that were awarded a FY23 Brownfields Job Training Grant are not eligible to apply for a FY24 Brownfields Job Training Grant. Note this was previously known as Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training (EWDJT) Grants. EPA's Program Brochure and Success Stories: https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2016-03/documents/final_ewdjt_tri-fold_brochure_7-30-15_0.pdf Renewable Energy or Energy-Efficient Approaches in Brownfields Redevelopment Fact Sheet: https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2020-08/documents/renewable_energy_or_energy-efficient_approaches.pdf No https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/environmental-workforce-development-and-job-training-ewdjt-grants
Existing - IIJA Increase Brownfields Multipurpose (MP) Grants
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To provide grant funding for a range of eligible purposes, including developing inventories of brownfield sites, prioritizing sites, engaging community stakeholders, conducting assessments, developing cleanup and reuse plans for key sites, conducting cleanup activities, and developing a revitalization plan. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization (OBLR) All applicants must meet the "threshold criteria" as outlined in the updated notice of funding opportunity. Not required $14,000,000 $800,000 17 $823,529 November 13, 2023 Transforming underutilized or abandoned sites in your community into revitalized energy hubs can also spur economic revitalization. These funds are meant to be transformative in efficiently addressing multiple stages of project redevelopment. Such funding could help communities inventory and prioritize brownfield sites for hosting renewable energy and develop cleanup plans, if needed, as well as reuse and revitalization plans. Funding could also help plan, assess, cleanup, and reinvent a larger industrial site for new clean energy manufacturing. Large brownfield sites can be future hubs for new manufacturing and clean energy jobs and offer opportunities to improve distributional equity where communities were previously neglected. Funding can be specifically used to conduct community engagement activities. This program has typically been offered every two years, unlike the annually recurring assessment, cleanup, and revolving loan fund grants. These are highly competitive projects geared at sites with the most compelling reuse. EPA's RE-Powering America's Land program offers detailed reports, case studies, and guidance for those looking to deploy renewable energy on brownfields: https://www.epa.gov/re-powering EPA requests that, if applicable, the applicant describe how the reuse of the priority site(s) will facilitate renewable energy from wind, solar, or geothermal energy; or will incorporate energy efficiency measures. For more information on clean energy reuse options, check out EPA's RE-Powering America's Lands initiative. No https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/brownfields-multipurpose-grants
Existing - IIJA Increase Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)
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To provide seed money to capitalize a revolving loan fund program including loans and subgrants to clean up and remediate sites across a region or community. Revolving loan funds are used to provide no-interest or low-interest loans for eligible brownfield cleanups, subgrants for cleanups, and other eligible programmatic costs necessary to manage the loan fund. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization (OBLR) Recipients must have a strong understanding of real estate financing principles and approaches, including loan underwriting, loan servicing, and credit analysis. Recipients also need to have the ability to market the program on an on-going basis during the performance period of the grant and after the closeout of the RLF Grant. Recipients commit to properly manage funds and program income generated by their program until its official close. Only entities without open RLF cooperative agreements are eligible to apply. Not required $10,000,000 $1,000,000 10 $1,000,000 Supplemental grant request due March 15, 2024 These funds are meant to be transformative in efficiently cleaning up multiple sites for reuse. Consider pursuing with intent to reuse and convert of multiple brownfields into brightfields with one bulk procurement, either on a single or multijurisdictional basis. This is an opportunity for communities to take ownership of seed funding to accelerate the long-term revitalization of multiple brownfields. Consider creating regional partnerships to leverage financial, marketing, and program administration experience in order to build capacity for localized loans and subgrants. Using this funding to create new hubs for clean energy manufacturing and jobs and offer opportunities to improve distributional equity where communities were previously neglected. These are highly competitive projects geared at communities with extensive brownfield sites. If structured correctly, these revolving loan fund programs can generate program income from repayment of loans to sustain programs from a few years to decades. If selected, the lead entity will be the grant recipient and must administer the grant, be accountable to EPA for proper expenditure of the funds and be the point of contact for the other coalition members. In addition, a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) documenting the coalition’s site selection process must be in place prior to the expenditure of any funds that are awarded. The coalition members should identify and establish relationships necessary to achieve the project’s goal. A process for successful execution of the project’s goal, including a description and role of each coalition member, should be established along with the MOA. The purpose of the MOA is for coalition members to agree internally on the distribution of funds and the mechanisms for implementing the cleanup work. $60 million in supplemental funding is available for entities that have an open Brownfield Revolving Loan Fund grant. See here for application details: https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/fy-2024-availability-supplemental-funds-eligible-brownfields-revolving-loan-fund-grants No https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/brownfields-revolving-loan-fund-rlf-grants
New - IRA Climate Pollution Reduction Grants (CPRG) - Implementation
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To implement GHG reduction programs, policies, projects, and measures identified in a Priority Climate Action Plan (PCAP) developed under a CPRG planning grant. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) Only entities that directly received a CPRG planning grant are eligible to apply for an implementation grant. Not required $4,300,000,000 for general competition; $300,000,000 for Tribes and territories $500,000,000 for general competition; $25,000,000 for Tribes and territories 115 for general competition; 100 for Tribes and territories $37,400,000 for general competition; $3,000,000 for Tribes and territories April 1, 2024 (general); May 1, 2024 (Tribes and territories) This program is designed to implement ambitious measures that will achieve significant cumulative GHG reductions by 2030 and beyond, achieve substantial community benefits, and pursue innovative policies and programs that are replicable and can be “scaled up” across multiple jurisdictions. The NOFO specifically encourages applicants to consider projects that stimulate transformation toward a decarbonized economy and demonstrate approaches that are replicable to unlock opportunities for even greater emissions reductions. Consider prioritizing projects that are located in economically and environmentally distressed communities and maximize the long-term benefits for residents of the region. Local governments are encouraged to integrate community benefits into project scopes and milestones. The NOFO specifically calls out the goal to pursue measures that will achieve substantial community benefits (such as reduction of criteria air pollutants (CAPs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs)), particularly in low-income and disadvantaged communities as well as projects that incorporate high labor standards, emphasize job quality, and support equitable workforce development. EPA will not award multiple grants to implement the same measure in the same location; therefore, communication and coordination between entities that may be considering applying to fund similar measures should occur prior to applications being submitted. Because the State of Florida, State of Iowa, Commonwealth of Kentucky, and State of South Dakota declined to participate in the planning grant phase of this program, no state agencies, departments, or other executive branch-level offices in those 4 states can be eligible applicants for the CPRG implementation grant phase. Similarly, no local government office or air pollution control agency within those 4 states is eligible to apply under this NOFO, except for those municipalities and air agencies covered by PCAPs developed for the following MSAs: 1. Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL Metro Area 2. Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL Metro Area 3. Orlando–Kissimmee–Sanford, FL Metro Area 4. Jacksonville, FL Metro Area 5. North Port-Sarasota-Bradenton, FL Metro Area 6. Des Moines-West Des Moines, IA Metro Area 7. Cedar Rapids, IA Metro Area 8. Iowa City, IA Metro Area 9. Louisville/Jefferson County, KY-IN Metro Area 10. Lexington-Fayette, KY Metro Area 11. Bowling Green, KY Metro Area 12. Rapid City, SD Metro Area https://www.epa.gov/inflation-reduction-act/cprg-implementation-grants
New - IRA Climate Pollution Reduction Grants (CPRG) - Planning
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To (1) tackle damaging climate pollution while supporting the creation of good jobs and lowering energy costs for families, (2) accelerate work to address environmental injustice and empower community-driven solutions in overburdened neighborhoods, and (3) deliver cleaner air by reducing harmful air pollution in places where people live, work, play, and go to school. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) Funding is available for states (including District of Columbia and Puerto Rico), local governments, territories, and Tribal communities. Entities included in, or covered by, such plans will be eligible to apply for implementation funding. Not required $250,000,000 N/A N/A $3,000,000 for state planning; $1,000,0000 for metropolitan statistical area (MSA) planning March 31, 2023 (states); April 28, 2023 (MSAs) Planning grant recipients can use funding to design climate action plans that incorporate a variety of measures to reduce GHG emissions from across their economies in 6 key sectors (electricity generation, industry, transportation, buildings, agriculture/natural and working lands, and waste management). Consider prioritizing projects that are located in economically and environmentally distressed communities and maximize the long-term benefits for residents of the region. Local governments are encouraged to integrate community benefits into project scopes and milestones. Municipal departments/agencies are encouraged to work together to develop comprehensive emission reduction plans. Consider leveraging private investment to expand efforts. EPA encourages eligible entities to develop or, where applicable, revise their existing climate plans consistent with programmatic priorities. Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact EPA prior to submitting applications. EPA will award planning grants in July-August 2023.  https://www.epa.gov/inflation-reduction-act/climate-pollution-reduction-grants#CPRGProgramGuidance
Existing - Increase Economic Adjustment Assistance Program (EAA) - Assistance to Coal Communities (ACC)
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To produce multiple economic and workforce development outcomes for workers and communities negatively impacted by changes in the coal economy, such as promoting regional economic growth and diversification, new job creation, and reemployment opportunities for displaced coal economy workers. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration (EDA) There is no pre-defined list of impacted coal communities. Projects must be consistent with the region’s current Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) or equivalent EDA-accepted regional economic development strategy that meets EDA’s CEDS or strategy requirements. Minimum cost share of 20%, varying based on level of economic distress $48,000,000 $30,000,000 N/A $500,000 to$3 million for implementation projects and from $100,000 to $350,000 for planning activities TBA This funding can support the public infrastructure needed to create new or enhance existing programs for clean energy or EV supply chain opportunities. Explore integrating new clean energy and EV supply chain manufacturing hubs/business parks into regional economic development plans. Where possible, consider whether partnerships with universities or community colleges could be leveraged to launch an economic diversification and workforce development strategy to promote and enhance the growth of emerging clean energy industries and retain local talent. This is an opportunity to enhance supply chains, attract new energy and transportation sectors, and provide job training for out of work energy and industry professionals or those looking to transition to clean energy and EV supply chain related industries. This is particularly critical for communities in transition from being heavily reliant on coal. Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact the EDA representative listed for their applicable State in Section G of this NOFO before submitting an application to EDA to clarify technical matters involving their project, its alignment with EDA’s mission and Investment Priorities, and all other relevant publicly available information relating to general technical matters. Due to the extraordinary level of interest in EDA’s CARES Act Recovery Assistance there has been an unusually high volume of applications received. Prospective applicants are strongly encouraged to contact their applicable EDA Regional Office representatives to discuss their needs and availability of funds. Prospective applicants can find current contact information for EDA Regional Office staff at https://www.eda.gov/contact/. No https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=321695
New - IRA Energy Infrastructure Reinvestment Program
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To provide loans to retool, repurpose, or replace electric or fossil fuel energy infrastructure that has ceased operations, or to enable operating infrastructure to avoid, reduce, utilize or sequester air pollutants or greenhouse gas emissions. Department of Energy (DOE) Loan Programs Office (LPO) Projects must: Retool, repower, repurpose, or replace legacy energy infrastructure; OR enable operating energy infrastructure to avoid, reduce, utilize or sequester air pollutants or GHGs Eligible energy infrastructure is a facility, and associated equipment, used for: the generation or transmission of electricity; OR the production, processing, and delivery of fossil fuels, fuels derived from petroleum, or petrochemical feedstocks. Not required $5,000,000,000 in credit subisdy and up to $250,000,000 in loan authority through FY2026 N/A N/A Minimum project loans are expected to be at least $100,000,000 Rolling - Request a pre-application consultation if you are interested: https://www.energy.gov/lpo/request-pre-application-consultation The EIR reinvests in energy communities while reducing carbon emissions. The EIR will support the low-carbon transition of a broad range of projects — any type of energy infrastructure related to electricity generation and transmission, as well as all fossil fuels and petrochemicals. The program has the potential to help decarbonize not just the electricity sector, but the entirety of fossil infrastructure in this country, both through replacing polluting sources with cleaner alternatives, and through reducing pollution in harder-to-abate sectors. The equitable and cost-effective transition to a cleaner grid requires retooling and repurposing of outdated facilities with prime location and capacity, which are often located in or near LMI communities and communities of color. The reduction of air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions from previously and currently operating facilities in these communities is a significant part of the Justice40 Initiative. Moreover, the transition from coal to clean energy risks devastating communities historically reliant on the jobs and economic activity brought by investment and dependence on fossil fuels. Leaving coal miners, plant operators, and their surrounding communities without recourse is unjust and will not lead to a sustainable and equitable transition. Learn more about how your community or utility could consider leveraging this program here: https://rmi.org/important-clean-energy-policy-youve-never-heard-about/ Potential applicants with projects that could be eligible for the EIR program and are currently further along in development should become familiar with certain requirements applicable to all loans and loan guarantees issued under Title 17. These requirements can be found in the Title 17 Innovative Clean Energy (section 1703) solicitation here: https://www.energy.gov/sites/default/files/2022-04/DOE-LPO_Innovative_Clean_Energy_Loan_Guarantee_Solicitation_18Apr22.pdf No https://www.energy.gov/lpo/energy-infrastructure-reinvestment
Existing - Decrease Partnerships for Opportunity and Workforce and Economic Revitalization (POWER)
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To support economic diversity, enhanced job training and re-employment opportunities, create jobs in existing or new industries, and attract new sources of investment in communities affected by job losses in coal mining, coal power plant operations, and coal-related supply chain industries. Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) N/A Applicants must be in an eligible Appalachian county across the 13-state region: https://www.arc.gov/Appalachian-counties-served-by-arc/ Minimum 20% cost share required $65,000,000 $1,500,000; $2,500,000 for broadband projects; $50,000 for planning N/A N/A March 8, 2023 (Letter of Intent); April 19, 2023 (Full Application) POWER grants help communities develop new supply chains, clean energy manufacturing, and workforce training. Consider using planning funding to build partnerships to train contractors for deep efficiency and electrification retrofits for commercial and residential buildings. Recent awardees have included projects for sustainable jobs, solar energy training and deployment, bike trail networks, HVAC and electrical engineering skills training, and other energy, economic diversification, and workforce development-related initiatives. This program helps communities recover from declines in coal and manufacturing sectors and transition to new industries. The ARC may prioritize its funding and match rates based on levels of economic distress: https://www.arc.gov/match-requirements-for-arc-grants/ Partnerships that leverage existing educational programs or industry collaborations are heavily encouraged. Regional consortia and public-private partnerships are viewed particularly favorably and also highlight a range of strengths and non-federal leverage. Consider inviting ARC staff to participate in specific roundtables or community events with your regional team to get their input directly as you build momentum for funding support. FY2022 awards can be found here highlighting a wide range of workforce, decarbonization, and resiliency goals: https://www.arc.gov/wp-content/uploads/2023/02/POWER-Award-Summaries-by-State-as-of-December-2022.pdf FY2023 awards: https://www.arc.gov/news/arc-awards-nearly-54-million-to-advance-economic-diversification-in-appalachias-coal-impacted-communities/ No https://www.arc.gov/grants-and-opportunities/power/#:~:text=The%20Partnerships%20for%20Opportunity%20and%20Workforce%20and%20Economic,to%20the%20changing%20economics%20of%20America%E2%80%99s%20energy%20production.
Existing - Constant Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development Assistance (EA/REDA) Grants
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To assist agricultural producers and rural small businesses in eligible rural areas for energy audits, renewable energy technical assistance, and renewable energy site assessments. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development Assistance must be provided to agricultural producers and rural small businesses. Rural small businesses must be located in eligible rural areas. This restriction does not apply to agricultural producers. Be sure to review the program guidance for eligible and ineligible use of funds: https://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/rural-energy-america-program-energy-audit-renewable-energy-development-assistance Not required Unknown $100,000 Unknown $100,000 January 31, 2025 Grants are provided for energy audits, renewable energy technical assistance, and site assessments for renewable energy. These investments can also help lower energy costs for small businesses and agricultural producers. This is funding that governments and partners can use to accelerate adoption of renewable energy at agricultural and business sites. Rural small businesses must be located in eligible rural areas. However, this restriction does not apply to agricultural producers. Guaranteed Loans are accepted on a continuous application cycle. No https://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/rural-energy-america-program-energy-audit-renewable-energy-development-assistance
Existing Rural Innovation Stronger Economy (RISE) Grants
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To grant assistance to create and augment high-wage jobs, accelerate the formation of new businesses, support industry clusters and maximize the use of local productive assets in eligible low-income rural areas. Department of Agriculture Rural Development Eligible applicants are rural jobs accelerator partnerships with expertise in delivering economic and job training programs 20% $500,000 $2,000,000 April 20, 2023 The Rural Business Cooperative Service (BRCS) Administrator may award points for projects that advance identified Rural Development Key Priorities, including "Addressing Climate Change and Environmental Justice". Funds can be used to: Build or support a business incubator facility; Provide worker training to assist in the creation of new jobs; Train the existing workforce with skills for higher-paying jobs; Develop a base of skilled workers and improve their opportunities to obtain high-wage jobs in new or existing local industries. The RISE program is enacted through the 2018 Farm Bill, which expires in FY 2023. The program continuity is subject to the new Farm Bill expected from Congress by the end of 2023. No https://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/business-programs/rural-innovation-stronger-economy-rise-grants#overview
  • To explore and implement strategies that return legacy coal mining sites to productive uses through economic and community development. The AMLER Program supports local investment opportunities that provide for sustainable long-term rehabilitation of coalfield economies.
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  • To evaluate potentially contaminated sites that may need cleanup from prior use. The program offers community-wide assessments for multiple community sites, site-specific grants for an already identified single-site project focus, and assessment coalition grants to increase the capacity of multijurisdictional entities to assess sites in multiple communities.
    Compare
  • To clean up one brownfield site, or multiple brownfield sites, contaminated by hazardous substances, pollutants, contaminants (including hazardous substances co-mingled with petroleum), and/or petroleum.
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  • To deliver Brownfields Job Training programs that recruit, train, and place local, unemployed and under-employed residents with the skills needed to secure full-time employment in the environmental field.
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  • To provide grant funding for a range of eligible purposes, including developing inventories of brownfield sites, prioritizing sites, engaging community stakeholders, conducting assessments, developing cleanup and reuse plans for key sites, conducting cleanup activities, and developing a revitalization plan.
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  • To provide seed money to capitalize a revolving loan fund program including loans and subgrants to clean up and remediate sites across a region or community. Revolving loan funds are used to provide no-interest or low-interest loans for eligible brownfield cleanups, subgrants for cleanups, and other eligible programmatic costs necessary to manage the loan fund.
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  • To implement GHG reduction programs, policies, projects, and measures identified in a Priority Climate Action Plan (PCAP) developed under a CPRG planning grant.
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  • To (1) tackle damaging climate pollution while supporting the creation of good jobs and lowering energy costs for families, (2) accelerate work to address environmental injustice and empower community-driven solutions in overburdened neighborhoods, and (3) deliver cleaner air by reducing harmful air pollution in places where people live, work, play, and go to school.
    Compare
  • To produce multiple economic and workforce development outcomes for workers and communities negatively impacted by changes in the coal economy, such as promoting regional economic growth and diversification, new job creation, and reemployment opportunities for displaced coal economy workers.
    Compare
  • To provide loans to retool, repurpose, or replace electric or fossil fuel energy infrastructure that has ceased operations, or to enable operating infrastructure to avoid, reduce, utilize or sequester air pollutants or greenhouse gas emissions.
    Compare
  • To support economic diversity, enhanced job training and re-employment opportunities, create jobs in existing or new industries, and attract new sources of investment in communities affected by job losses in coal mining, coal power plant operations, and coal-related supply chain industries.
    Compare
  • To assist agricultural producers and rural small businesses in eligible rural areas for energy audits, renewable energy technical assistance, and renewable energy site assessments.
    Compare
  • To grant assistance to create and augment high-wage jobs, accelerate the formation of new businesses, support industry clusters and maximize the use of local productive assets in eligible low-income rural areas.
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