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Funding Guidance

America’s Federal Funding Opportunities and Resources for Decarbonization

This tool is primarily intended to streamline state, local, non-profit, and community efforts to increase understanding of eligible funding, tax credits, and other incentives relevant to your project, goals, and community. The tool focuses on decarbonization efforts, including electricity, transportation, buildings, and resilient energy systems. It does not exhaustively capture federal resources for other topics. Use the filters below to sort available funding sources automatically and focus on the funding sources relevant to your project, goals, and community. Then use the compare feature to select up to 4 programs most relevant to review side-by-side.

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The AFFORD tool will be updated on a monthly basis until otherwise noted. This version of AFFORD was last updated in January 2024.

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For more information on the AFFORD tool, check out our Funding Guidance. Contact Matthew Popkin (mpopkin@rmi.org) or Alex Dane (alex.dane@wri.org) with any questions or feedback.

Displaying 30 out of 255 Funding Opportunities
New or Existing Program Name Purpose Agency Sub-Department Eligibility Requirements Matching Funding Available Max Award Expected Allocations Average Award Deadline Decarbonization Considerations Equity Considerations Helpful Tips Other Notes Only for Federal Emergency Declaration? Webpage
New - IRA 45/45Y: Clean Electricity Production Tax Credit
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To provide a tax credit for the production of clean electricity. 45 is applicable for facilities producing electricity before 2025. 45Y is a technology-neutral tax credit for production of clean electricity starting in 2025. Department of Treasury Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Solar, wind, georthermal, and closed loop biomass before 2025 and facilities generating electricity for technologies with zero greenhouse gas emissions after 2025 N/A 2.75 cents/kWh inflation adjusted N/A Uncapped for 10 years N/A Phase-out starts the later of (a) 2032 or (b) when U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from electricity are 25% of 2022 emissions or lower Only electricity that has zero greenhouse gas emissions may qualify for 45Y Credit decreased by 5X for projects that do not meet the prevailing wage and apprenticeship requirements. An additional 0.275 cents/kWh credit is added for projects meeting certain domestic content requirements for steel, iron, and manufactured products. An additional 0.275 cents/kWh credit is added if the facility is located in an energy community. See more on the bonuses here: https://cityrenewables.org/funding-guidance/understanding-available-incentives/leveraging-energy-transition-adders/ Tax-exempt entities can leverage these credits through a new mechanism known as "elective" or "direct" pay. To learn more about how these tax credits work for entities with and without tax liability, check out our Funding Guidance here: https://cityrenewables.org/funding-guidance/understanding-available-incentives/tax-credits-for-renewable-energy/ Section 13703 offers an additional tax deduction for facilities or property qualifying for this tax credit. These facilities or property will be treated as a 5-year property for purposes of cost recovery; meaning, they will be able to deduct from their taxable income the depreciating value of their business assets, such as equipment, faster than the value actually declines. In practical terms, qualifying facilities or property will be able to take bigger deductions—leaving them with lower taxable income—in the earlier years of a clean energy investment. Solar now qualifies for the first time Entities can only elect the ITC (48) or the PTC (45). For more information on the tax credits and which to select, see this resource from DOE: https://www.energy.gov/eere/solar/federal-solar-tax-credits-businesses No https://www.irs.gov/credits-and-deductions-under-the-inflation-reduction-act-of-2022
New - IRA 45U: Zero-Emission Nuclear Power Production Credit
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To provide tax credits for electricity produced at a qualified nuclear power facility. Department of Treasury Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Facilities eligible for the 45J advanced nuclear production tax credit are not eligible for the 45U credit. N/A 0.3 cents/kWh, inflation adjusted after 2024 N/A Uncapped for 10 years N/A Not available for tax years beginning after 12/31/32 Must be zero carbon electricity produced at the nuclear facility. A 5 times multiplier is available if prevailing wage requirement is met for workers doing alteration or repair at the facility. Tax-exempt entities can leverage these credits through a new mechanism known as "elective" or "direct" pay. To learn more about how these tax credits work for entities with and without tax liability, check out our Funding Guidance here: https://cityrenewables.org/funding-guidance/understanding-available-incentives/tax-credits-for-renewable-energy/ Credit amount phases down depending on the amount of energy produced and the gross receipts of the nuclear power facility. https://energycommunities.gov/funding-opportunity/zero-emission-nuclear-power-production-credit-26-u-s-code-%C2%A4-45u/
New - IRA 48/48E: Clean Electricity Investment Tax Credit
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To provide a tax credit for facilities that generate clean electricity. 48 is applicable to facilities that generate clean electricity before 2025. 48E is a technology-neutral tax credit for investment in facilities that generate clean electricity starting in 2025. Department of Treasury Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Eligible technologies include fuel cell, solar, geothermal, small wind, energy storage, biogas, microgrid controllers, combined heat and power properties before 2025 and any resource with an estimated net greenhouse gas emissions rate of zero after 2025 N/A Up to 30% of eligible project costs. If project does not meet prevailing wage and apprenticeship requirements, the credit is only worth 6% of the tax basis. Note that projects less than 1MW do not need to meet prevailing wage and apprenticeship requirements to still earn 30% of the tax basis. 70% Uncapped for 10 years N/A Available for projects that begin construction or are placed in service after December 31, 2024. Tax credit 48 available for projects that begin construction or are put in servie before 2025. Updates in the IRA provide greater opportunities to utilize this tax credit. Consider under-utilized properties like brownfields for new clean energy projects to take advantage of bonus credits. Additionally, consider pairing energy storage with any of your energy projects to increase community resiliency and the scale of your project. Pairing this tax credit with bonus adders like the Energy Communities and Low-Income Communities bonuses by siting clean energy projects in applicable locations can reduce the cost of the overall project and provide additional benefits to disadvantaged communities. Learn more about these bonus adders here: https://cityrenewables.org/funding-guidance/understanding-available-incentives/leveraging-energy-transition-adders Tax-exempt entities can leverage these credits through a new mechanism known as "elective" or "direct" pay. To learn more about how these tax credits work for entities with and without tax liability, check out our Funding Guidance here: https://cityrenewables.org/funding-guidance/understanding-available-incentives/tax-credits-for-renewable-energy/ See the latest IRS guidance on ITC here: https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/jy1920 Learn more about tax credits for renewable energy here: https://cityrenewables.org/funding-guidance/understanding-available-incentives/tax-credits-for-renewable-energy/ Entities can only elect the ITC (48) or the PTC (45). For more information on the tax credits and which to select, see this resource from DOE: https://www.energy.gov/eere/solar/federal-solar-tax-credits-businesses For projects <1 MW, entities do not have to meet the prevailing wage and apprenticeship requirements No https://energycommunities.gov/funding-opportunity/clean-electricity-investment-tax-credit-26-u-s-code-%c2%a4-48e/
New - IRA Clean Communities Investment Accelerator
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To support hub nonprofits that will provide funding and technical assistance to specific industry networks of public, quasi-public, not-for-profit, and nonprofit community lenders, supporting the goal that every community in the country has access to the capital they need to deploy clean technology projects in their homes, small businesses, schools, and community institutions. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund (OGGRF) Eligible applicants are nonprofit organizations that is designed to provide capital, leverage private capital, and provide other forms of financial assistance for the rapid deployment of low- and zero-emission products, technologies, and services. Not required $6,000,000,000 N/A 2-7 N/A October 12, 2023 The three priority project categories are distributed energy generation and storage, net zero-emissions buildings, and zero-emissions transportation. Consider how to provide financial assistant to integrated efforts, such as using distributed energy generation and storage to supply electricity for buildings and EV charging stations. Applications must include a program budget that allocates at least 40% of grant funds for the purposes of providing financial assistance in low-income and disadvantaged communities. Consider partnering with community-based organizations to develop strategies and plans to improve community engagement and streamline project deployment. N/A The National Clean Investment Fund and Clean Communities Investment Accelerator will work in tandem to deploy much-needed capital for clean technologies into communities across the country. The National Clean Investment Fund will create centralized, long-term financing institutions with the scale required to transform financial markets, while the Clean Communities Investment Accelerator will build the capacity of community lenders to draw on that capital to catalyze deployment of projects in communities all across the country—especially in communities that have long faced barriers accessing capital and that most need the benefits of clean technology projects. https://www.epa.gov/greenhouse-gas-reduction-fund/clean-communities-investment-accelerator
New Clean Energy to Communities Program (C2C)
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To connect local governments, tribes, electric utilities, and community-based organizations with national laboratory experts and customized, cutting-edge analysis to achieve clean energy systems that are reflective of local and regional priorities. Programs include In-Depth Partnerships, Peer-Learning Cohorts, and Expert Match. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Community teams for in-depth partnerships must be composed of local governments, community-based organizations, and utilities; eligibility for other programs varies, but is generally open to local governments and their partners. Not required N/A N/A 6 for In-Depth Partnerships; ~100 for Peer-Learning Cohorts; ~200 for Expert Matches N/A October 31, 2023 for January launch cycle, May 8, 2024 for July Launch cycle This program offers a variety of techincal assistance programs to help communities explore and implement climate solutions using NREL data and expertise. In-Depth partnerships offer special focus for rural communities. Peer Learning Cohorts help participants refine engagement approaches, integrating community engagement into planning, prioritizing equitable communitywide outcomes, and broadening accountability structures and tracking equitable implementation. The Expert Match program emphasizes programs of "disadvantaged status," with the definition left up to applicants to define. To receive email updates about the C2C program, complete and submit the sign-up form: https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=fp3yoM0oVE-EQniFrufAgNt_3wZP-x5Ctr39GcXU8J5UQU8zQ09LMjI4OE85OVRGUzJMT1ZRNlhaWS4u N/A No https://www.nrel.gov/state-local-tribal/clean-energy-to-communities.html
New - IRA Climate Pollution Reduction Grants (CPRG) - Implementation
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To implement GHG reduction programs, policies, projects, and measures identified in a Priority Climate Action Plan (PCAP) developed under a CPRG planning grant. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) Only entities that directly received a CPRG planning grant are eligible to apply for an implementation grant. Not required $4,300,000,000 for general competition; $300,000,000 for Tribes and territories $500,000,000 for general competition; $25,000,000 for Tribes and territories 115 for general competition; 100 for Tribes and territories $37,400,000 for general competition; $3,000,000 for Tribes and territories April 1, 2024 (general); May 1, 2024 (Tribes and territories) This program is designed to implement ambitious measures that will achieve significant cumulative GHG reductions by 2030 and beyond, achieve substantial community benefits, and pursue innovative policies and programs that are replicable and can be “scaled up” across multiple jurisdictions. The NOFO specifically encourages applicants to consider projects that stimulate transformation toward a decarbonized economy and demonstrate approaches that are replicable to unlock opportunities for even greater emissions reductions. Consider prioritizing projects that are located in economically and environmentally distressed communities and maximize the long-term benefits for residents of the region. Local governments are encouraged to integrate community benefits into project scopes and milestones. The NOFO specifically calls out the goal to pursue measures that will achieve substantial community benefits (such as reduction of criteria air pollutants (CAPs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs)), particularly in low-income and disadvantaged communities as well as projects that incorporate high labor standards, emphasize job quality, and support equitable workforce development. EPA will not award multiple grants to implement the same measure in the same location; therefore, communication and coordination between entities that may be considering applying to fund similar measures should occur prior to applications being submitted. Because the State of Florida, State of Iowa, Commonwealth of Kentucky, and State of South Dakota declined to participate in the planning grant phase of this program, no state agencies, departments, or other executive branch-level offices in those 4 states can be eligible applicants for the CPRG implementation grant phase. Similarly, no local government office or air pollution control agency within those 4 states is eligible to apply under this NOFO, except for those municipalities and air agencies covered by PCAPs developed for the following MSAs: 1. Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL Metro Area 2. Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL Metro Area 3. Orlando–Kissimmee–Sanford, FL Metro Area 4. Jacksonville, FL Metro Area 5. North Port-Sarasota-Bradenton, FL Metro Area 6. Des Moines-West Des Moines, IA Metro Area 7. Cedar Rapids, IA Metro Area 8. Iowa City, IA Metro Area 9. Louisville/Jefferson County, KY-IN Metro Area 10. Lexington-Fayette, KY Metro Area 11. Bowling Green, KY Metro Area 12. Rapid City, SD Metro Area https://www.epa.gov/inflation-reduction-act/cprg-implementation-grants
New - IRA Climate Pollution Reduction Grants (CPRG) - Planning
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To (1) tackle damaging climate pollution while supporting the creation of good jobs and lowering energy costs for families, (2) accelerate work to address environmental injustice and empower community-driven solutions in overburdened neighborhoods, and (3) deliver cleaner air by reducing harmful air pollution in places where people live, work, play, and go to school. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) Funding is available for states (including District of Columbia and Puerto Rico), local governments, territories, and Tribal communities. Entities included in, or covered by, such plans will be eligible to apply for implementation funding. Not required $250,000,000 N/A N/A $3,000,000 for state planning; $1,000,0000 for metropolitan statistical area (MSA) planning March 31, 2023 (states); April 28, 2023 (MSAs) Planning grant recipients can use funding to design climate action plans that incorporate a variety of measures to reduce GHG emissions from across their economies in 6 key sectors (electricity generation, industry, transportation, buildings, agriculture/natural and working lands, and waste management). Consider prioritizing projects that are located in economically and environmentally distressed communities and maximize the long-term benefits for residents of the region. Local governments are encouraged to integrate community benefits into project scopes and milestones. Municipal departments/agencies are encouraged to work together to develop comprehensive emission reduction plans. Consider leveraging private investment to expand efforts. EPA encourages eligible entities to develop or, where applicable, revise their existing climate plans consistent with programmatic priorities. Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact EPA prior to submitting applications. EPA will award planning grants in July-August 2023.  https://www.epa.gov/inflation-reduction-act/climate-pollution-reduction-grants#CPRGProgramGuidance
Existing - Increase Electric Infrastructure Loan & Loan Guarantee Program (LGP)
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To finance the construction of electric distribution, transmission, and generation facilities, including system improvements and replacement required to furnish and improve electric service in rural areas, as well as demand-side management, energy conservation programs, and on-grid and off-grid renewable energy systems. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development Check with a General Field Representative (GFR) to determine whether the proposed service area qualifies as rural. Funds may be used to finance: - Maintenance, Upgrades, Expansion, Replacement of distribution, sub transmission and headquarters (service, warehouse) facilities - Energy efficiency - Renewable energy systems Not required Loan Guarantees up to 100% None 25 $45,700,000 Rolling Consider utilizing this loan guarantee program for financing rural on-grid and off-grid renewable energy systems, smart meters for demand-side management, and building electrical upgrades for electrification. See the "Equity Design Considerations for Federal Funding" for general considerations and additional sector-based resources: https://cityrenewables.org/resources/equity-design-considerations-for-federal-funding/ N/A N/A No https://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/electric-infrastructure-loan-loan-guarantee-program
New - IRA Empowering Rural America (New ERA)
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To provide loans and other financial assistance for electric cooperatives to achieve emissions reductions through the purchase or deployment of renewable energy, or to make energy efficiency improvements to existing electric generation or transmission systems. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Utilities Service (RUS) Eligible recipients include electric cooperatives, particularly those serving predominantly rural areas, and its subsidiaries. 75% cost share required for grants $9,700,000,000 $970,000 N/A N/A September 15, 2023 (Letter of Intent) The program prioritizes emissions reductions rather than requiring the use of specific technologies. For example, you can seek funding for renewable and zero-emission systems that eliminate aging, obsolete, or expensive infrastructure. You can also change your purchased-power mixes to support cleaner portfolios, manage stranded assets, and boost your transition to clean energy. When building new renewable energy systems, consider designing local workforce development initiatives (i.e. solar training), developing programs that lower income residents and small businesses could subscribe to in order to reduce their energy burden (i.e. community solar), and adequately compensating those communities where new projects are being sited. Applications will be scored and ranked on the greatest reduction in cost-per-unit measure of greenhouse gases. Projects must be reliable, resilient (able to recover quickly following an unexpected disruption), and affordable. The cost of unit of reduction will be considered. Funding is available until 2031. https://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/electric-programs/empowering-rural-america-new-era-program
New Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Competitive Program
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To directly invest in projects that develop, promote, implement, and manage energy efficiency and conservation, including clean energy. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of State and Community Energy Programs (SCEP) Eligible entities include only those US local governments and Indian Tribes that are ineligible for the EECBG formula grant. Not required $8,800,000 $2,000,000 10 to 20 $586,667 June 5, 2023 (Concept Paper); August 7, 2023 (Full Application) Consider using funds to enhance or enable innovative energy financing strategies that spread project costs out over time or capture additional incentives. These may be more complex, but can often extend the impact - bill savings and energy savings were at least 2X higher in the original EECBG program than other efforts when EECBG funds were utilized for more ambitious and/or "complex" financial incentive programs. EECBG can help provide technical assistance to assist disadvantaged communities who lack the capacity or resources to put forward competitive applications. For additional information on past program use, how EECBG funding was used to accelerate partners, and case studies, check out: http://www.usmayors.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/0227-report-eecbgsurvey.pdf EECBG was first passed in 2007, amended with the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) of 2009, and expired in 2016. The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) of 2021 recapitalizes the program and expands upon previous eligibility. $550,000,000 in funding available until expended. https://www.energy.gov/scep/energy-efficiency-and-conservation-block-grant-program-competitive-funding-announcement
Existing - IIJA Increase Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG)
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To directly invest in or provide technical assistance vouchers for projects that develop, promote, implement, and manage energy efficiency and conservation, including clean energy. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Cities, towns and villages with a population of at least 35,000 are eligible for this formula funding; at a minimum, the ten largest cities in each state, including Puerto Rico, regardless of population, are eligible to apply; all other cities, villages, and towns can apply for EECBG funds or technical assistance through their state. Not required $550,000,000 Varies All eligible recipients of formula funding Varies by municipality Pre-Application Information Sheet and State and territory applications are due ASAP. Full applications for local governments and Tribal communities are due by April 30, 2024. Consider using funds to enhance or enable innovative energy financing strategies that spread project costs out over time or capture additional incentives. These may be more complex, but can often extend the impact - bill savings and energy savings were at least 2X higher in the original EECBG program than other efforts when EECBG funds were utilized for more ambitious and/or "complex" financial incentive programs. EECBG can help provide technical assistance to assist disadvantaged communities who lack the capacity or resources to put forward competitive applications. As an alternative to traditional grants, DOE will providing Local and Tribal governments with the option to apply for vouchers to receive technical assistance and/or equipment rebates. Vouchers provide a streamlined application process with fewer administrative requirements and allow Local and Tribal governments to take advantage of customized technical expertise or get reimbursed for eligible equipment. Eligible entities may choose to use a voucher or a grant, but not both. Voucher applicants do NOT need to follow the grant application process. More information about voucher applications has been released! See the EECBG Program Formula Grant Application Hub for the Voucher Handbook and Voucher Application Templates. For more information on the Biden Administration's current approach for EECBG, see this October 2023 announcement: https://www.energy.gov/articles/biden-harris-administration-announces-30-million-clean-energy-funding-28-state-local-and For additional information on past program use, how EECBG funding was used to accelerate partners, and case studies, check out: http://www.usmayors.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/0227-report-eecbgsurvey.pdf No https://www.energy.gov/eere/wipo/energy-efficiency-and-conservation-block-grant-program
New - IRA Energy Infrastructure Reinvestment Program
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To provide loans to retool, repurpose, or replace electric or fossil fuel energy infrastructure that has ceased operations, or to enable operating infrastructure to avoid, reduce, utilize or sequester air pollutants or greenhouse gas emissions. Department of Energy (DOE) Loan Programs Office (LPO) Projects must: Retool, repower, repurpose, or replace legacy energy infrastructure; OR enable operating energy infrastructure to avoid, reduce, utilize or sequester air pollutants or GHGs Eligible energy infrastructure is a facility, and associated equipment, used for: the generation or transmission of electricity; OR the production, processing, and delivery of fossil fuels, fuels derived from petroleum, or petrochemical feedstocks. Not required $5,000,000,000 in credit subisdy and up to $250,000,000 in loan authority through FY2026 N/A N/A Minimum project loans are expected to be at least $100,000,000 Rolling - Request a pre-application consultation if you are interested: https://www.energy.gov/lpo/request-pre-application-consultation The EIR reinvests in energy communities while reducing carbon emissions. The EIR will support the low-carbon transition of a broad range of projects — any type of energy infrastructure related to electricity generation and transmission, as well as all fossil fuels and petrochemicals. The program has the potential to help decarbonize not just the electricity sector, but the entirety of fossil infrastructure in this country, both through replacing polluting sources with cleaner alternatives, and through reducing pollution in harder-to-abate sectors. The equitable and cost-effective transition to a cleaner grid requires retooling and repurposing of outdated facilities with prime location and capacity, which are often located in or near LMI communities and communities of color. The reduction of air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions from previously and currently operating facilities in these communities is a significant part of the Justice40 Initiative. Moreover, the transition from coal to clean energy risks devastating communities historically reliant on the jobs and economic activity brought by investment and dependence on fossil fuels. Leaving coal miners, plant operators, and their surrounding communities without recourse is unjust and will not lead to a sustainable and equitable transition. Learn more about how your community or utility could consider leveraging this program here: https://rmi.org/important-clean-energy-policy-youve-never-heard-about/ Potential applicants with projects that could be eligible for the EIR program and are currently further along in development should become familiar with certain requirements applicable to all loans and loan guarantees issued under Title 17. These requirements can be found in the Title 17 Innovative Clean Energy (section 1703) solicitation here: https://www.energy.gov/sites/default/files/2022-04/DOE-LPO_Innovative_Clean_Energy_Loan_Guarantee_Solicitation_18Apr22.pdf No https://www.energy.gov/lpo/energy-infrastructure-reinvestment
Existing - IRA Increase Environmental Justice Government-to-Government Program (EJG2G)
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To support government activities that lead to measurable environmental or public health impacts in communities disproportionately burdened by environmental harms. Model EJG2G programs should leverage existing resources to develop processes or tools that integrate environmental justice considerations into governmental decision-making at all levels. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Environmental Justice and External Civil Rights (OEJECR) Eligible applicants include States, territories, Tribal governments, and local governments in partnership with a community-based nonprofit organization. Not required $70,000,000 $20,000,000; $10,000,000 for certain entities 70 $1,000,000 April 14, 2023 This program specifically aims to achieve measurable and meaningful environmental and/or public health results in communities. Consider using it to coordinate between governments to build toward common climate goals and reduce redundant or conflicting efforts. This program specifically aims to (1) build broad and robust, results-oriented partnerships, particularly with community-based nonprofit organizations (CBO) within disproportionately impacted areas; (2) pilot activities in specific communities that create transferable models, which can be expanded or replicated in other geographic areas, and; (3) strengthen the development and implementation of meaningful approaches to achieve environmental justice. N/A This program was formerly known as EPA's State Environmental Justice Cooperative Agreement Program (SEJCA). FY23 recipients here: https://www.epa.gov/newsreleases/biden-harris-administration-announces-nearly-128-million-environmental-justice No https://www.epa.gov/environmentaljustice/environmental-justice-government-government-program
Existing - IRA Increase Environmental Justice Thriving Communities Grantmaking program (EJ TCGM)
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To reduce barriers to the federal grants application process communities face and increase the efficiency of the awards process for environmental justice grants. Eligible activities include but are not limited to project development, blueprints for construction or cleanup projects, schematics, and technical development, work to get permits in place directly related to an environmental project, smaller land purchases and acquisitions, implementation of project plans, and public outreach and education. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Environmental Justice and External Civil Rights (OEJECR) Eligible applicants are community-based nonprofit organizations and partnerships with them. Note that there are both grantmaker awards and subrecipients of grants. Eligible subrecipients include non-profit organizations, community-based organizations, Tribal governments, Native American organizations, local governments, institutions of higher education, territories, and Freely Associated States. Not required $550,000,000 $50,000,000 11 $50,000,000 June 30, 2023 Grants can be used to plan community-wide residential home retrofit projects that promote energy-efficient homes to help residents save energy bills, lower carbon emissions, and live healthier lives. Besides, consider using this grant to plan cleanup projects and help transition brownfields to brightfields: developing community solar farms to supply clean energy to the community. This opportunity will help transform disadvantaged and underserved communities into healthy, thriving communities capable of addressing the environmental and public health challenges they have historically faced, as well as current and future challenges. Applications are required to describe how the proposed project will ensure the process to be accessible to underserved communities, communities in urban, remote and rural areas, and community stakeholders with the highest degree of burden and capacity constraints. EPA will make awards to up to 11 Grantmakers that coordinate nationwide coverage to provide support and funding opportunities to Eligible Subrecipients. Subgrants include: Phase I assessment proejcts up to $150,000, Phase II planning projects up to $250,000, and Phase III development projects up to $350,000 EPA plans to award approximately 10 Regional Grantmaker awards and one nationwide award to a National Grantmaker who will provide coordination services for the Regional Grantmakers and fill gaps in coverage. Applicants can submit up to two applications as long as each application is for a different Geographic Area, which can be a EPA Region or National Geographic Area. https://www.google.com/url?q=https://www.epa.gov/environmentaljustice/environmental-justice-thriving-communities-grantmaking-program&sa=D&source=editors&ust=1695432173413344&usg=AOvVaw1oUnEltShqXe3bz4QtC36c
New - IIJA Grid Innovation Program - Grid Resilience and Innovation Partnerships (GRIP) Program
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To coordinate and collaborate with electric sector owners and operators to demonstrate innovative approaches to transmission, storage, and distribution infrastructure to harden and enhance resilience and reliability and demonstrate new approaches to enhance regional grid resilience. Department of Energy (DOE) Grid Deployment Office (GDO) & Office of Clean Energy Demonstrations (OCED) Eligible entities include states, combinations of states, Indian Tribes, unites of local government, and public utility commissions. 50% cost share required $1,820,000,000 $250 million in general, $1 billion for projects that deploy significant transmission investments 4-40 $180,000,000 January 12, 2024 (Concept Paper); April 17, 2024 (Full Application) The shift from fossil fuels to electricity hinges on a reliable electric grid, making grids resilient to disaster, and upgrading grids with modern technology to help improve service reliability, reduce costs, and encourage electrification. Historically marginalized communities are more vulnerable to grid outages. Consider demonstration projects that showcase adaptive microgrids, or reliable and resilient system operations utilizing high levels of distributed renewable generation and energy storage in these communities to minimize disruptions. N/A N/A No https://www.energy.gov/gdo/grid-innovation-program
New Grid Resilience State/Tribal Formula Grant Program
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To strengthen and modernize America’s power grid against wildfires, extreme weather, and other natural disasters that are exacerbated by the climate crisis by providing funding to states, terrioriteis and tribes. Department of Energy (DOE) Grid Deployment Office (GDO) The program will distribute funding to states, territories, and federally recognized Indian tribes, including Alaska Native Regional Corporations and Alaska Native Village Corporations, over five years based on a formula that includes factors such as population size, land area, probability and severity of disruptive events, and a locality’s historical expenditures on mitigation efforts. The states, territories, and tribes will then award these funds to a diverse set of projects, with priority given to efforts that generate the greatest community benefit providing clean, affordable, and reliable energy. 15% match required for states and Indian tribes, 100% match required for sub-grantees with exceptions N/A $4.3 million in first two years N/A N/A May 31, 2023 (states/territories); August 31, 2023 (Tribal communities) This year, the U.S. has already incurred $15 billion in extreme climate-related disaster costs, underscoring the urgent need to strengthen the grid to deliver dependable power supply to Americans. States, territories and tribes are instructed to give the money efforts that generate the greatest community benefit providing clean, affordable, and reliable energy. See the "Equity Design Considerations for Federal Funding" for general considerations and additional sector-based resources: https://cityrenewables.org/resources/equity-design-considerations-for-federal-funding/ See FY2023 awardees here: https://www.energy.gov/articles/biden-harris-administration-announces-125-million-grid-resilience-grants-states-and-tribal Over the next five years, the Grid Resilience State and Tribal Formula Grants will distribute a total of $2.3 billion to States, Territories, and federally recognized Tribes, including Alaska Native Regional Corporations and Alaska Native Village Corporations, based on a formula that includes factors such as population size, land area, probability and severity of disruptive events, and a locality’s historical expenditures on mitigation efforts. https://www.energy.gov/gdo/grid-resilience-statetribal-formula-grant-program
New - IIJA Grid Resilience Utility and Industry Grants - Grid Resilience and Innovation Partnerships (GRIP) Program
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To support activities, technologies, equipment, and measures meant to reduce the likelihood and consequences of electric grid damage in the face of extreme weather events. Department of Energy (DOE) Grid Deployment Office (GDO) & Office of Clean Energy Demonstrations (OCED) Eligible recipients for the competitive program include: electric grid operators, electricity storage operators, electricity generators, transmission owners or operators, distribution providers, and fuel suppliers. 50% cost share required in general, 1/3 cost share required for small utilities $918,000,000 in total; 30% of the total funding will be set aside for small utilities. Either the total of the applicant's last three years of resilience investments or $100 million, whichever is lower 10-20 $91,800,000 Concept paper due 1/12/2024 Consider activities that are supplemental to existing grid resilience efforts, reduce the risk of power lines causing a wildfire, or reduce the likelihood and consequences of disruptive events. Eligible uses include, but are not limited to, weatherization technologies and equipment, undergrounding of electrical equipment, relocation of power lines, and use or construction of distributed energy resources like microgrids and battery storage. Historically marginalized communities are often more vulnerable to grid outages. Consider building microgrids, new distribution lines, and/or upgrading existing transmission infrastructure to minimize the disruptions in these communities. This Program falls under a broader DOE Initiative "Building a Better Grid (which includes multiple federal funding streams). For more information, see: https://www.energy.gov/oe/articles/building-better-grid-initiative Small utilities are defined as entities that sell no more than 4,000,000 MWh of electricity per year. No https://www.energy.gov/gdo/grid-resilience-utility-and-industry-grants
Existing - Constant Innovative Energy Loan Guarantee Program (Title 17)
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To eliminate gaps in commercial financing for energy projects in the United States that utilize innovative technology to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions and support clean energy deployment and energy infrastructure reinvestment in the United States. LPO can provide first-of-a-kind projects and other high-impact, energy-related ventures with access to debt capital and flexible financing that private lenders cannot provide. Department of Energy (DOE) Loans Program Office (LPO) Eligible projects must satisfy all four of the following basic eligibility requirements: Innovative Technology, Greenhouse Gas Benefits, Located in the United States, and Reasonable Prospect of Repayment. Not required $4,500,000,000 N/A N/A N/A Rolling Consider utilizing loan guarantees to finance advanced grid integration, energy storage, on-site and off-site renewable energy, and electrification and energy efficiency improvements in residential and commercial buildings. See the "Equity Design Considerations for Federal Funding" for general considerations and additional sector-based resources: https://cityrenewables.org/resources/equity-design-considerations-for-federal-funding/ Detailed program guidance is available here: https://www.energy.gov/lpo/articles/program-guidance-title-17-clean-energy-program N/A No https://www.energy.gov/lpo/renewable-energy-efficient-energy-projects-loan-guarantees
Existing - IIJA Increase Maintaining and Enhancing Hydroelectricity Incentives
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To incentivize owners and operators of hydroelectric facilities for capital improvements related to maintaining and enhancing hydroelectricity generation by improving grid resiliency, improving dam safety, and environmental improvements. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) An owner or authorized operator of an existing facility that is licensed or has received an exemption from licensing from FERC pursuant to the Federal Power Act or is a hydroelectric project constructed, operated, or maintained pursuant to a permit or valid existing right-of-way granted prior to June 10, 1920, or a license granted pursuant to the Federal Power Act prior to November 15, 2021, may apply for incentive payments for maintaining and enhancing its facility. 70% cost share required $553,600,000 $5,000,000 N/A N/A June 22, 2023 (Letter of Intent); October 6, 2023 (Full Application) Hydroelectric power generation can, in certain areas, provide carbon-free baseload power for communities. Optimized generation facilities can generate more power with less waste. Hydroelectric facilities should be supported with regard to up- and downstream communities, as well as natural ecosystems and neighborhoods that might be (dis)affected by generation activities. Planning and engagement should be conducted to clearly communicate and/or mitigate potential negative impacts that would disproportionally affect underserved communities. If interested, check the application guidance here: https://www.energy.gov/sites/default/files/2023-06/247-Final-Guidance_Modification_0001-0007_6-13-23.pdf $553,600,000 in funding available until expended. No https://www.energy.gov/gdo/section-247-maintaining-and-enhancing-hydroelectricity-incentives
New - IRA National Clean Investment Fund
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To fund national nonprofit clean financing institutions capable of partnering with the private sector to provide accessible, affordable financing for clean technology projects. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund (OGGRF) Eligible applicants are nonprofit organizations that is designed to provide capital, leverage private capital, and provide other forms of financial assistance for the rapid deployment of low- and zero-emission products, technologies, and services. Not required $13,970,000,000 $13,970,000,000 3 $4,656,666,667 October 12, 2023 The three priority project categories are distributed energy generation and storage, net zero-emissions buildings, and zero-emissions transportation. Consider how to provide financial assistant to integrated efforts, such as using distributed energy generation and storage to supply electricity for buildings and EV charging stations. Applications must include a program budget that allocates at least 40% of grant funds for the purposes of providing financial assistance in low-income and disadvantaged communities. Consider partnering with community-based organizations to develop strategies and plans to improve community engagement and streamline project deployment. N/A The National Clean Investment Fund and Clean Communities Investment Accelerator will work in tandem to deploy much-needed capital for clean technologies into communities across the country. The National Clean Investment Fund will create centralized, long-term financing institutions with the scale required to transform financial markets, while the Clean Communities Investment Accelerator will build the capacity of community lenders to draw on that capital to catalyze deployment of projects in communities all across the country—especially in communities that have long faced barriers accessing capital and that most need the benefits of clean technology projects. https://www.epa.gov/greenhouse-gas-reduction-fund/national-clean-investment-fund
New - IRA Powering Affordable Clean Energy (PACE)
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To forgive up to 60% of loans for renewable energy projects that use wind, solar, hydropower, geothermal, or biomass, as well as for renewable energy storage projects. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development’s Rural Utilities Service (RUS) The PACE program is available to eligible applicants that generate electricity for resale to residents in both rural and nonrural areas. However, at least 50% of the population served by your proposed renewable energy project must live in communities with populations under 20,000. Not required $1,000,000,000 $100,000,000 N/A Minimum loan is $1,000,000 September 29, 2023 (rolling) Energy storage projects related to a renewable energy project is an eligible use of funding. Adding energy storage to a project can reduce peak demand and provide community resiliency benefits that a standalone renewable energy project is unable to. The program supports designated energy communities, disadvantaged communities, distressed communities, and Tribal communities. Siting proposed projects in eligible IRA bonus adder locations can reduce the overall cost of a project, provide clean energy and economic benefits to a disadvantaged community, and support broader community goals. Always ensure that impacted communities are provided opportunities to engage with the project development and implementation process. Projects must be based on bankable power purchase agreements (PPAs) or through a financial guarantee that ensures the financial feasibility of the project. Energy must be sold for resale to eligible off-takers which can include both utility and non-utility customers. The technologies used must be commercially available. Note: This is NOT related to programs often called PACE (Property Assessed Clean Energy) in many states. Provided the project is otherwise financially feasible, loan terms are the shorter of: 35 years; the useful life of the equipment financed; the term of the PPA; or the term of any leased real property. https://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/electric-programs/powering-affordable-clean-energy-pace-program
Existing - Constant Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development Assistance (EA/REDA) Grants
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To assist agricultural producers and rural small businesses in eligible rural areas for energy audits, renewable energy technical assistance, and renewable energy site assessments. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development Assistance must be provided to agricultural producers and rural small businesses. Rural small businesses must be located in eligible rural areas. This restriction does not apply to agricultural producers. Be sure to review the program guidance for eligible and ineligible use of funds: https://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/rural-energy-america-program-energy-audit-renewable-energy-development-assistance Not required Unknown $100,000 Unknown $100,000 January 31, 2025 Grants are provided for energy audits, renewable energy technical assistance, and site assessments for renewable energy. These investments can also help lower energy costs for small businesses and agricultural producers. This is funding that governments and partners can use to accelerate adoption of renewable energy at agricultural and business sites. Rural small businesses must be located in eligible rural areas. However, this restriction does not apply to agricultural producers. Guaranteed Loans are accepted on a continuous application cycle. No https://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/rural-energy-america-program-energy-audit-renewable-energy-development-assistance
Existing - IIJA Increase Smart Grid Grants (GRIP)
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To fund grid investments that provide flexibility and help quickly rebalance the electrical system, facilitate the aggregation or integration of distributed energy resources, provide energy storage, provide voltage support, and anticipate and mitigate impacts of extreme weather events or natural disasters on grid resilience. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity (OE) Eligible applicants include electric utilities, such as investor-owned utilities, municipality-owned utilities; Load serving entities, or load distribution companies, which provide electricity distribution services; Retail distributors or marketers of electricity which sell electricity to consumers; System operators which coordinate, control, and monitor the operation of the electrical power transmission systems within a single state or region; and Manufacturers of appliances and equipment to enable smart grid functionalities. Projects must promote the goal of deployment, including development of component technologies. 50% cost share required $1,080,000,000 $50 million, except (a) Projects that aggregate multiple utility service territories: $100 million (b) Projects that deploy advanced conductors for transmission line capacity improvement at scale: $250 million 25-40 $33,750,000 January 12, 2024 (Concept Paper); April 17, 2024 (Full Application) This program helps to implement the necessary upgrades to the electric grid enabling it to work more efficiently and be more resilient, as well as making it capable to effectively integrate renewable and energy efficient technologies and demand management practices. Applicants should partner with utilities to identify local and regional needs. Applicants should consider partnering with utilities to train a next-generation smart grid workforce. N/A This program falls under the broader Grid Resilience and Innovation Partnerships (GRIP) Program. See more at: https://www.energy.gov/gdo/grid-resilience-and-innovation-partnerships-grip-program No https://www.energy.gov/gdo/smart-grid-grants
New - IRA Solar for All
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To spur the deployment of residential distributed solar energy and catalyze transformation in markets serving low-income and disadvantaged communities. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund (OGGRF) States, municipalities, Tribal governments, or eligible nonprofit recipients are eligible to apply. Eligible nonprofit recipients are those nonprofit organizations designing to provide capital, leverage private capital, and provide other forms of financial assistance for the rapid deployment of low- and zero-emission products, technologies, and services. Not required $7,000,000,000 $400,000,000 60 $116,666,667 July 31, 2023 (Notice of Intent due for states, August 14, 2023 for territories, municipalities, and eligible nonprofit recipients); August 28, 2023 (Notice of Intent for Tribal governments); October 12, 2023 (Full Application) To enhance the impact of decarbonization, consider creating financial programs that combine clean energy projects with energy efficiency improvements, including weatherization and electrification measures. Local governments are also encouraged to collaborate with community-based organizations on public education about clean energy, zero-emission technology, and energy efficiency improvements. In addition to providing financial support and other incentives to help low-income households get access to residential rooftop and residential-serving community solar energy, consider establishing workforce training programs that enable underserved communities to participate in the economic opportunity created by the energy transition. For additional guidance, see this memo on Developing an Impactful Solar for All Proposal, which provides a high-level summary of the Solar for All program, summarizes program strategy considerations, and offers technical and pragmatic insights for key EPA evaluation criteria to inform strong, impactful Solar for All applications. Here is the link: https://rmi.org/developing-an-impactful-solar-for-all-proposal/ The award size can depend on the total population of disadvantaged census tracts identified by the Climate and Economic Justice Screening Tool (CEJST) in the geography the program will cover. Check the CEJST here: https://screeningtool.geoplatform.gov/ https://www.epa.gov/greenhouse-gas-reduction-fund/solar-all
Existing - IIJA Increase State Energy Program (SEP)
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To enhance energy security, advance state-led energy initiatives, and maximize the benefits of decreasing energy waste. SEP emphasizes the state’s role as the decision maker and administrator for program activities within the state that are tailored to their unique resources, delivery capacity, and energy goals. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Eligibility for the award is restricted to states applying for formula grant financial assistance under SEP. Interested municipalities, local agencies, and non-profits should contact their state energy offices to learn more about how to access funding. 20% cost share required $500,000,000 Varies by state Varies by state N/A FY23 funding has been distributed, check with your state office This funding can be a catalytic force in developing enabling mechanisms that can drive decarbonization strategies and projects at the local level and across multiple sectors. Consider developing and implementing financing mechanisms for institutional retrofits; loan program and management; energy savings performance contracting; comprehensive residential programs for homeowners; transportation programs that accelerate the use of alternative fuels; and renewable programs that remove barriers and support supply-side and distributed renewable energy. Where appropriate, consider retrofitting existing facilities including schools that may be part of a community resiliency hub strategy to include efficiency, weatherization, and energy storage. A broad range of health, housing, educational, and social services can be sought for marginalized communities. There is great potential to pursue energy justice by pursuing public education, participant inclusion, collaboration, and transparency in decision-making process; and retrofitting project/community solar to increase renewable energy and reduce burdens. The program can advance innovative initiatives that include scalable financing programs (e.g., Loan Loss Reserves, Revolving Loan Funds, and Interest Rate Buy-Down Programs) as well as emerging programs focused on equity and frontline community end-beneficiaries. SEP Program Fact Sheet 2021: https://www.energy.gov/sites/default/files/2021/01/f82/SEP-fact-sheet_2021.pdf $500,000,000 in funding available until expended. See FY23 allocations here: https://www.energy.gov/sites/default/files/2023-03/Final%20PY23%20Formula%20Allocations.pdf No https://www.energy.gov/eere/wipo/state-energy-program-guidance
New - IIJA Transmission Facilitation Program (TFP)
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To facilitate the construction of electric power transmission lines and related facilities; to provide loans to applicants attempting to construct or replace transmission lines, increase the capacity of existing transmission lines, or incorporate isolated grids into a larger transmission, telecommunications, or infrastructure network. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity (OE) Eligible electric power transmission lines must be greater than 1,000 MW for new lines, upgrades to existing lines (or new lines in existing corridors) must be greater than 500 MW. Eligible entities are any entities seeking to carry out an eligible project (see Other Notes). See details for cost recovery and capacity contract term requirements $2,550,000,000 N/A $2.5 billion in borrowing authority, $50M for administration ($10M per year) N/A February 1, 2023 for Part I; 45 days from invitation to apply for Part II This program is aimed at facilitating transmission capacity expansion. DOE will enter into capacity contracts for transmission capacity (capped at 50% of line capacity and 40-year terms). These may be with third parties, for which a competitive solicitation must occur, or as public-private partnerships. Local governments interested in transmission capacity projects in order to integrate renewable energy or increase system resiliency may choose to participate either as a partner in a capacity contract, or in related planning activities. See the "Equity Design Considerations for Federal Funding" for general considerations and additional sector-based resources: https://cityrenewables.org/resources/equity-design-considerations-for-federal-funding/ Eligible projects include: (A) to construct a new or replace an existing eligible electric power transmission line; (B) to increase the transmission capacity of an existing eligible electric power transmission line; or (C) to connect an isolated microgrid to an existing transmission, transportation, or telecommunications infrastructure corridor located in Alaska, Hawaii, or a territory of the United States. Note that related facilities do not include generation facilities or facilities used to distribute electricity locally. No https://www.energy.gov/gdo/transmission-facilitation-program-0
New - IRA Transmission Facility Financing
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To provide direct loans to non-federal borrowers for the construction or modification of electric transmission facilities. Department of Energy (DOE) Grid Deployment Office (GDO) Eligible non-federally owned transmission facilities must be designated to be necessary in the national interest by the Secretary of the DOE according to the transmission studies conducted every 3 years under Section 216(a) of the Federal Power Act of 2005 in concert with affected States and Tribes. Not required $2,000,000,000 through FY2030 N/A N/A N/A TBA The transition away from fossil fuels to a carbon-free grid requires significant investments in transmission facilities to move electricity generated from large renewable power sources (particularly hydro and wind) to distribution networks. In addition, large-scale renewables typically require specific natural resources (solar and wind), which means that electricity may have to be transported further from the site of generation than with fossil fuels. The construction of large-scale transmission projects is necessary to facilitate the connection of distant renewable energy sources to communities, and advocates including the Center for American Progress have long called for removing barriers to interregional collaboration, and minimizing disruption to communities with the construction of new transmission lines. Economic development activities in the areas surrounding these projects should support those affected communities, and move towards the White House Justice40 goals. Learn more here: https://www.americanprogress.org/article/advancing-equity-grid-modernization/ N/A Transmission facilities determined necessary in the national interest are set by the criteria listed in section 216(a) of the Federal Power Act. No https://www.energy.gov/gdo/transmission-facility-financing
New - IRA Transmission Siting and Economic Development Grants Program
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To support transmission siting authorities on siting impact analyses, examination of alternate siting corridors, participation in regulatory proceedings in another jurisdiction, actions that may shorten the approval or permitting process, or economic development activities for communities affected by the siting of the project. Department of Energy (DOE) Grid Deployment Office (GDO) "Siting Authority" refers to State, local, or tribal entities with authority to make a final decision regarding siting, permitting, or regulatory status of a covered project. "Covered transmission projects" include high-voltage interstate or offshore electricity transmission lines, that operate at a minimum of (interstate) 275 kilovolts (AC or DC) or (offshore) 200 kilovolts (AC or DC). 50% cost share required for specific activities $760,000,000 $10,000,000 for siting and permitting awards, $50,000,000 for economic development awards 14 - 40 awards for siting and permitting, 4 - 40 awards for economic development N/A October 31, 2023 (Concept Papers); April 5, 2024 (Full Application) Siting processes for transmission facilities can significantly delay large-scale projects if not properly regulated. This grant funding available for transmission siting creates specific incentives to speed up the process, and ease the siting and permitting process for State, local, and tribal siting authorities. The construction of large-scale transmission projects is necessary to facilitate the connection of distant renewable energy sources to communities, and advocates including the Center for American Progress have long called for removing barriers to interregional collaboration, and minimizing disruption to communities with the construction of new transmission lines. Economic development activities in the areas surrounding these projects should support those affected communities, and move towards the White House Justice40 goals. Learn more here: https://www.americanprogress.org/article/advancing-equity-grid-modernization/ Community-based projects can include: Energy investments such as resilient microgrids, renewable power integration, or electric vehicle charging infrastructure; support for essential community facilities for public safety, healthcare, education, and improved transit; or encouraging community togetherness by investing in community centers and creating green spaces; and support for a growing workforce with job training and apprenticeship programs. Final decisions on the siting or permitting of the covered transmission project must be made not later than 2 years after the date on which the grant is provided. Economic development funds may only be released after the approval or commencement of construction of the covered transmission project. https://www.energy.gov/gdo/transmission-siting-and-economic-development-grants-program
New - IRA Tribal Electrification Program
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To provide financial and technical assistance to Tribes to increase the number of Tribal homes with zero-emissions electricity. Department of Interior (DOI) Office of the Assistant Secretary - Indian Affairs Eligible applicants are Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations, as defined in 25 U.S.C. 5304(e), including Tribal Consortia and Alaska Native Corporations. Not required $145,000,000 $20,000,000 5-50 $5,272,727 August 17, 2023 (Pre-Application); September 30, 2023 (Full Application) When designing a project, select the best source of clean energy that tailors to each Tribal community, including new electrification technologies and energy efficient systems. Preference will go to Tribes with higher poverty, and/or Tribes with fewer resources and less expertise to develop electrification projects at community or individual home levels. Higher levels of poverty is defined as having an average combined household income that does not exceed 150% of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Poverty Income Guidelines (published annually in January) (25 CFR 256.9-.11). This funding can be used as a match. If planning for an integrated project involving other elements such as battery storage, consider braiding this funding with other programs to achieve a bigger impact. The program requires that electricity is to be provided “to unelectrified Tribal homes through zero-emissions energy systems” and for “transitioning electrified Tribal homes to zero-emissions". The grant process aims to balance this zero-emissions requirement with the need to connect unelectrified homes to existing power grids. The BIA is working to establish funding criteria to balance these two considerations – options may be to define zero-emissions to include a netting option where energy efficient measures resulting in. https://www.bia.gov/service/electrification
New Voluntary State, Regional, and Local Electricity Distribution Planning
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To provide assistance to States, regional organizations, and electric utilities to facilitate the development of State, regional, and local electricity distribution plans by (1) conducting a resource assessment and analysis of future demand and distribution requirements; (2) developing open-source tools for State, regional, and local planning and operations. Department of Energy (DOE) N/A Eligible entities include states, regional reliability entities, and other distribution asset owners and operators. Not required $175,000,000 N/A N/A N/A New program, deadline unknown. No funding is associated with this effort. Upon request, eligible entities may receive technical assistance from the DOE on electricity planning. Such assistance may be valuable to plan for increased renewable energy resources and integration of distributed generation assets and electric vehicles and associated charging infrastructure. See the "Equity Design Considerations for Federal Funding" for general considerations and additional sector-based resources: https://cityrenewables.org/resources/equity-design-considerations-for-federal-funding/ This assistance is by request of the Secretary of Energy. Communities and eligible entities should consult with senior local leadership, Congressional delegations, and/or their governor to make the case and generate support for such a request. $175 million annually for FY 21-25 is authorized to be appropriated for this and 4 other sections. Program expires 2025. No https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml;jsessionid=D7BE72233683EB447B470C8E7F7D6025?path=&req=owner&f=treesort&fq=true&num=2341&hl=true&edition=prelim
  • To provide a tax credit for the production of clean electricity. 45 is applicable for facilities producing electricity before 2025. 45Y is a technology-neutral tax credit for production of clean electricity starting in 2025.
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  • To provide tax credits for electricity produced at a qualified nuclear power facility.
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  • To provide a tax credit for facilities that generate clean electricity. 48 is applicable to facilities that generate clean electricity before 2025. 48E is a technology-neutral tax credit for investment in facilities that generate clean electricity starting in 2025.
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  • To support hub nonprofits that will provide funding and technical assistance to specific industry networks of public, quasi-public, not-for-profit, and nonprofit community lenders, supporting the goal that every community in the country has access to the capital they need to deploy clean technology projects in their homes, small businesses, schools, and community institutions.
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  • To connect local governments, tribes, electric utilities, and community-based organizations with national laboratory experts and customized, cutting-edge analysis to achieve clean energy systems that are reflective of local and regional priorities. Programs include In-Depth Partnerships, Peer-Learning Cohorts, and Expert Match.
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  • To implement GHG reduction programs, policies, projects, and measures identified in a Priority Climate Action Plan (PCAP) developed under a CPRG planning grant.
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  • To (1) tackle damaging climate pollution while supporting the creation of good jobs and lowering energy costs for families, (2) accelerate work to address environmental injustice and empower community-driven solutions in overburdened neighborhoods, and (3) deliver cleaner air by reducing harmful air pollution in places where people live, work, play, and go to school.
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  • To finance the construction of electric distribution, transmission, and generation facilities, including system improvements and replacement required to furnish and improve electric service in rural areas, as well as demand-side management, energy conservation programs, and on-grid and off-grid renewable energy systems.
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  • To provide loans and other financial assistance for electric cooperatives to achieve emissions reductions through the purchase or deployment of renewable energy, or to make energy efficiency improvements to existing electric generation or transmission systems.
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  • To directly invest in projects that develop, promote, implement, and manage energy efficiency and conservation, including clean energy.
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  • To directly invest in or provide technical assistance vouchers for projects that develop, promote, implement, and manage energy efficiency and conservation, including clean energy.
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  • To provide loans to retool, repurpose, or replace electric or fossil fuel energy infrastructure that has ceased operations, or to enable operating infrastructure to avoid, reduce, utilize or sequester air pollutants or greenhouse gas emissions.
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  • To support government activities that lead to measurable environmental or public health impacts in communities disproportionately burdened by environmental harms. Model EJG2G programs should leverage existing resources to develop processes or tools that integrate environmental justice considerations into governmental decision-making at all levels.
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  • To reduce barriers to the federal grants application process communities face and increase the efficiency of the awards process for environmental justice grants. Eligible activities include but are not limited to project development, blueprints for construction or cleanup projects, schematics, and technical development, work to get permits in place directly related to an environmental project, smaller land purchases and acquisitions, implementation of project plans, and public outreach and education.
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  • To coordinate and collaborate with electric sector owners and operators to demonstrate innovative approaches to transmission, storage, and distribution infrastructure to harden and enhance resilience and reliability and demonstrate new approaches to enhance regional grid resilience.
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  • To strengthen and modernize America’s power grid against wildfires, extreme weather, and other natural disasters that are exacerbated by the climate crisis by providing funding to states, terrioriteis and tribes.
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  • To support activities, technologies, equipment, and measures meant to reduce the likelihood and consequences of electric grid damage in the face of extreme weather events.
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  • To eliminate gaps in commercial financing for energy projects in the United States that utilize innovative technology to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions and support clean energy deployment and energy infrastructure reinvestment in the United States. LPO can provide first-of-a-kind projects and other high-impact, energy-related ventures with access to debt capital and flexible financing that private lenders cannot provide.
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  • To incentivize owners and operators of hydroelectric facilities for capital improvements related to maintaining and enhancing hydroelectricity generation by improving grid resiliency, improving dam safety, and environmental improvements.
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  • To fund national nonprofit clean financing institutions capable of partnering with the private sector to provide accessible, affordable financing for clean technology projects.
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  • To forgive up to 60% of loans for renewable energy projects that use wind, solar, hydropower, geothermal, or biomass, as well as for renewable energy storage projects.
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  • To assist agricultural producers and rural small businesses in eligible rural areas for energy audits, renewable energy technical assistance, and renewable energy site assessments.
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  • To fund grid investments that provide flexibility and help quickly rebalance the electrical system, facilitate the aggregation or integration of distributed energy resources, provide energy storage, provide voltage support, and anticipate and mitigate impacts of extreme weather events or natural disasters on grid resilience.
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  • To spur the deployment of residential distributed solar energy and catalyze transformation in markets serving low-income and disadvantaged communities.
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  • To enhance energy security, advance state-led energy initiatives, and maximize the benefits of decreasing energy waste. SEP emphasizes the state’s role as the decision maker and administrator for program activities within the state that are tailored to their unique resources, delivery capacity, and energy goals.
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  • To facilitate the construction of electric power transmission lines and related facilities; to provide loans to applicants attempting to construct or replace transmission lines, increase the capacity of existing transmission lines, or incorporate isolated grids into a larger transmission, telecommunications, or infrastructure network.
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  • To provide direct loans to non-federal borrowers for the construction or modification of electric transmission facilities.
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  • To support transmission siting authorities on siting impact analyses, examination of alternate siting corridors, participation in regulatory proceedings in another jurisdiction, actions that may shorten the approval or permitting process, or economic development activities for communities affected by the siting of the project.
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  • To provide financial and technical assistance to Tribes to increase the number of Tribal homes with zero-emissions electricity.
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  • To provide assistance to States, regional organizations, and electric utilities to facilitate the development of State, regional, and local electricity distribution plans by (1) conducting a resource assessment and analysis of future demand and distribution requirements; (2) developing open-source tools for State, regional, and local planning and operations.
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